Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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More Code

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Morse code was developed about 200 years ago by Samuel Fenchurch Bussover Morse. It's all very well and good, but it hasn't kept pace with technology. Nowadays, wired and wireless connections are sufficiently good to enable one to discriminate between more than just two sounds (dot, dash).

I suggest, therefore, that we add a third sound - quack - which would sound exactly as its name suggests. This gives us three sounds to play with, for a possible 27 three-character codes - enough for all the letters of the alphabet, plus an exclamation mark (which would be quack-quack-quack).

Obviously, four-character codes can be used to extend the repertoire, to include other punctuation marks, digits, and even multipliers such as a thousand, a million, and a billion (quack quack quack quack).

More Code is much more compact and efficient than Morse code. Above all, though, it would add a much-needed note of levity to listening posts and war-rooms, as they receive vital (and potentially disheartening) coded messages.

MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 22 2019

Drum Communication https://en.wikipedi...ms_in_communication
Long range comms since ages ago. [neutrinos_shadow, Jan 22 2019]

[link]






       We could also have Moron Code, which includes a fart sound. I've already had to warn 8th that he could be reduced to binary code, only without any of the 1s, so More Code [+] would serve to increase the extent of his punishment. This is a good outcome for everyone.
xenzag, Jan 22 2019
  

       By extension, we could even have 52 different characters, plus a few more for punctuation. They could all have their own sounds, or be combined in unique ways...
RayfordSteele, Jan 22 2019
  

       "Mo code, mo problems" (as The Notorious B.I.G. was oft reported to say on the matter)
zen_tom, Jan 22 2019
  

       A quick bit of programming tells me that the More Code for "DUCK" is "..QUACK .QUACK_ .._ _QUACK. "
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 22 2019
  

       In a different timeline on a different planet in a different reality within a different alternative universe, I imagine Morse code being developed not with long and short pulses or beeps, but a drum kit, consisting of at minimum a kick, snare, and hi-hat. There would be a defined lookup table of alphanumeric to drum combinations, not unlike our Morse code, but the difference would be much easier to discriminate, and you could possibly even dance to important and crucial messages as they come in.   

       Actually, this is stupid enough to form an idea of its own, and I’ll post it as one, as soon as I think of a title that outweighs the prowess of the idea.
Ian Tindale, Jan 22 2019
  

       Great, now the tinfoil types are going to start to look for hidden messages in 'Wipeout.'
RayfordSteele, Jan 22 2019
  

       [RayfordSteele] - only if you play it backwards.
Of course, drums have been used for communication for a very long time.
neutrinos_shadow, Jan 22 2019
  

       [+] but there's no reason to stick with dit and dah : suggested is "woof" and "meow".
FlyingToaster, Jan 23 2019
  

       [Ian] "Roland Code"?
hippo, Jan 23 2019
  

       I think there's some text-to-midi work out there, and I'm still yet to actually use it properly, but there's a thing called "Chirp" that translates text into R2D2-esque bleeps and blobs. Not quite dit, dah, quack, but a kind of extension of.   

       I guess the joy of code is that anything can be represented by (almost) anything else - there's a little bit of delight in that.
zen_tom, Jan 23 2019
  

       While it's true anything can be encoded/decode by any mapping, I have a gut thought there's something physical the brain and neuron's 'see' as well as the coding. The code and transfer act has an intrinsic truth connection to reality to help the internal model form and thrive.
wjt, Jan 23 2019
  

       I'm fairly confident that having every third character be "quack" will indeed convey an intrinsic quote.   

       What I need now is an adept Halfbaker to prepare an audio file that can be accessed from within the oak-panelled walls of the HB.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 23 2019
  
      
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