Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Assume a hemispherical cow.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                           

Moving Money

"Look, the queen is waving..."
  (+5, -1)
(+5, -1)
  [vote for,
against]

Inspired by Hippo's idea to keep counterfitting down.

Essentially, this is a bank note fitted with an oled (plastic LEDs) screen. A plastic strip in the weave would house the chip and the power supply. (They do make flexable ultrathin batteries and come to think of it rollable solar cells.)

Oleds are good because they can be printed on a pliable surface and use little power. Only one company would make the hardware for the chip and power supply. And it would be easier to track down the maker of such hardware rather than someone with a high quality printer. The money could also keep track of its own shelf life and shut down when you need to exchange it for fresh currency at a bank.

Also the money would glow in the dark with vibrant colors.

sartep, Jul 11 2005

OLEDs http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OLED
[sartep, Jul 11 2005]

Rollable Solar Cells http://www.iowathin...cts/rollableseries/
[sartep, Jul 11 2005]

[link]






       I would like mine to display 10 pounds when I receive it in change, then display 100 pounds when I spend it.
Ling, Jul 11 2005
  

       Ha. No only the pictures will be moving; that or the numbers could change colors actively.
sartep, Jul 12 2005
  

       Not exactly, because the oled is still a printed plastic as long as the number is intact and you still have the strip to fall back on for a number of features. If it malfunctions, its time is up and you will probably be instructed to go to the bank and get a new one. Imagine also in situations of changeovers like in the case of the Euro.   

       Also, it would glow in the dark with vibrant colors.   

       Hmm, should put that in the body.
sartep, Jul 12 2005
  

       With a little 'help! I'm being mugged!' button on it which renders it worthless.
moomintroll, Jul 12 2005
  

       It'll be hacked before its first day of existence has completed.
waugsqueke, Jul 12 2005
  

       //Also, it would glow in the dark with vibrant colors.// You could blind would-be muggers. That or allow them to find your money faster.
pooduck, Jul 13 2005
  

       Irrelevant if it is hacked, the fact that it can be used to make the money glow in the dark. Hacking the picture, might make the money worthless at the most.
sartep, Jul 13 2005
  

       Only if you could tell it was hacked.
waugsqueke, Jul 13 2005
  

       The trouble is that this is only an intermediate step between technologising cash to the extent that it all lives in a contactless stored-value wallet card (not unlike London's Oyster card, which is based on the Singapore and Hong Kong (and many other places) more mature and widespread Octopus card). In other words, given the expense and effort to embed OLEDs into paper money and have it accepted, you might as well jump all the way to an Oyster/Octopus-like system anyway. These systems aren't as widespread in application as 'real' paper money, but that could be fixed.
Ian Tindale, Jul 13 2005
  

       Yes, but if someone were to put into the picture, 'eat more cheese' it would be like someone taking a magic marker to a regular bill. If you didn't notice the superficial change, then you wouldn't care because the number would still be printed.   

       I thought oleds for a credit card might have already been baked, so I didn't post that. Actually, oleds need only be printed, that's the boon to the technology.
sartep, Jul 13 2005
  

       Why not a photovoltaic cell which uses UV light, which is already used to test for counterfeits? That way, you will hold it under the lamp, and not only will the hidden characters appear, but the {Queen/President/Etc.} will wave.
Alx_xlA, Jan 26 2009
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle