Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Assume a hemispherical cow.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                         

Multi Color Traffic Lights

Color blindness proof
  (+3, -2)
(+3, -2)
  [vote for,
against]

We've all seen the various color blindness tests, consisting largely of dotted patterns.

With the advent of the new LED based traffic lights, there is no longer a reason for the emitted light to be monochromatic.

Instead, design patterns into the light with multiple colors. Use colors visible to most color blind people and/or insert subliminal messages (e.g. "stop" or "go")

theircompetitor, Dec 08 2004

trigger idea Driving_20glasses_2...Colorblind_20people
[theircompetitor, Dec 08 2004]

[link]






       Baked. That's why there are three lights on the things already. You can tell what the signal is saying just by the position of the illuminated bulb. It's also why motorway signs use a top/bottom flash (nodding)if it is safe to use that lane and a left/right flash (shaking the head) if the lane is closed. Mind you it must confuse any colour blind Bulgarians, cos they nod to say no and shake head to say yes.
Belfry, Dec 08 2004
  

       Belfry, you're kidding or just not paying attention? :)   

       I mean multiple colors within a given light.
theircompetitor, Dec 08 2004
  

       I don't understand how your idea makes the situation any better. Please explain slowly and with short words, as though to a simple, yet winsome child
Belfry, Dec 08 2004
  

       Hi tc. , agree w/ Belfry about the arrangement being a key to the colorblind.
dentworth, Dec 08 2004
  

       dentworth,Belfry -- if the position is sufficient, why aren't they all the same color?   

       The idea here is that you could infuse a separate color into the dot pattern of the light, and that said color WOULD be visible to the color blind, and be distinct from the other colors.   

       You could additionally imbed messages into the light.
theircompetitor, Dec 08 2004
  

       I see what you mean but could the secondary colour be sufficiently visible without altering the primary colour? You could just end up with brown, brown and brown. Messages would not be legible without being really close and stationary. The present system does discriminate slightly against colour blind people (they have to concentrate a bit more at traffic lights) but I didn't think you could be refused a licence just for being colour blind.
Belfry, Dec 08 2004
  

       Most colorblind people are actually color deficient, meaning that they can't tell the difference as easily as most.   

       If you're a true dichromat, red and green look identical to you. If you can't tell the difference between a red light and a green light, you certainly can be denied a license for being colorblind.
Freefall, Dec 08 2004
  

       Colorblind or deficient people often compensate mysteriously for their reduced color sensitivity. Most still pass the tower light test for flight physicals and haven't any problem with traffic lights. Perhaps they become very sensitive to the differences in luminance or that emmissive color (lighting, displays, etc.) are quite different in appearance to the reflective light displays that most color vision tests use.   

       One of the best colorists I know tests about 80% red-green colorblind and yet, the guy's palettes and work are extraordinary. When he talks about it he says that the one thing he wishes he could do is be able to see how others interpret his color work.   

       He didn't even know he was colorblind until he was in his twenties and trying to pass a flight physical.
bristolz, Dec 08 2004
  

       I must have developed croissant blindness :)
theircompetitor, Dec 08 2004
  

       I remember hearing that there is enough blue in the green lights and yellow in the red lights that it aids those with red/green colorblindness in differentiating the "red" from the "green" light. Can't find any definitive references but it seems to make sense.
half, Dec 09 2004
  

       //He is careful to ensure other people make colour decisions for him.//   

       I thought that was wise for most men :)
theircompetitor, Dec 09 2004
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle