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Multilayer monitor displays

applying DVD ideal technology to display systems
 
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okay, this is kind of a fuzzy idea, but you could use the theretical DVD tchnology to allow for a monitor to show multi layer images for games or videos.

Think about it. if you got a golf ball and put it near to you, and a soccer ball further away, if you put the soccer ball in the same position, you can make them look the same size. in real life, the only thing that stops this is an eye's focus and our perpetually horrible 3d images created by the small images between our eyes.

You could have a seperate videocard for each layer (i know, it probably would take up too much space) but it would seriously add to the graphics quality of movies and such. i will probably check this again in a couple of hours so feel free to give this theory a thourough nerfing.

saddam_insane, Jun 28 2004

Flapping Sheet Hologram http://www.halfbake..._20Sheet_20Hologram
How to get 3D projected onto a screen. Maybe. [Amos Kito, Oct 04 2004]

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       I seem to be having trouble with the concept. Are you shooting for a 3D display, or a parallax scrolling-type display a la most 2D arcade platform games?   

       There was a vertical light box for advertising purposes that had a motorized layer (say a tennis ball) oscillating along the display column from a primary image (perhaps a tennis racquet). A mirror would redirect the vertical column to the viewer's eyes, giving a 3D type look. Is this akin to the concept?
lcllam2, Jun 28 2004
  

       Please check your spelling.   

       Presumably you're talking about making a monitor that uses similar technology to a dual-layer dvd burner. A dvd burner works because there's a certain temperature threshold that has to be crossed in order to write a bit. For this to work in a monitor, you need a (phosphor-like) substance whose visible output varies in a very non-linear way to its input; such a substance is the holy grail of xyz-addressed 3d display systems.
benjamin, Jun 29 2004
  
      
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