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Nuclear Energy

Following natures example for ecologically sound nuclear energy...
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Jim was pondering the safe disposal of nuclear waste and decided to look to nature for the answer... Jim concluded that he needed an 8 light (edit) minute barrier or better for safe nuclear energy and a warranty period of 4 to 7 billion years.

Jim immediately decided that a 4 by 3 by 2 black monolith containing radioative isotope coupled thermally for electrical potential is the only way to go. Jim is confidant that recent studies of the electical charge at the atomic surface will yield an efficient sandwhich of isotope and thermally active material.

By the way it is a battery...

madness, Jun 18 2009

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       This idea makes me so angry that i want to hit something with a bone over and over again really fast until it flies out of my hand and turns into a space station!
Not really, i'm fine. Have i got this wrong? Are you proposing a giant orbiting nuclear battery eight light seconds from the planet beaming power by microwave to electrical devices? If so, it's a nice image and is maybe just crazy enough to work [+].
nineteenthly, Jun 18 2009
  

       I was thinking more along the lines of never having to recharge my phone --- (although if I was orbiting just about the time my mum likes to catch up)...
madness, Jun 18 2009
  

       [marked-for-deletion] no idea, or at least no explanation of the idea which may or may not be in the author's mind
hippo, Jun 18 2009
  

       Maybe, but i made sense of it as being a little like a fission version of the sun: a humongous quantity of radioactive material in space which could be harnessed to transmit radiation to us but was safe due to being outside the Van Allen belts and low- maintenance because it's mostly just a big pile of actinides getting really hot.
nineteenthly, Jun 18 2009
  

       hippo --- there is sufficient here to describe the exact form of the battery...   

       For instance, Can you tell me how two objects are thermally coupled?
madness, Jun 18 2009
  

       //Following natures example for ecologically sound nuclear energy...//   

       You mean Stanley's example, right?
ldischler, Jun 18 2009
  

       Ummm not sure --- is Stanley devine?   

       By the way thank you nineteenthly... I always figured radiation transport was viable technotrickery...
madness, Jun 18 2009
  

       Eight light-seconds is not a million miles away from...us.
coprocephalous, Jun 18 2009
  

       It needn't be trickery in any arcane sense though, because if you had a sufficiently large mass of sufficiently radioactive material, say a mole of oranges, it would release heat, and if you dispensed with the oranges and replaced them with something more sensible such as thorium, you'd have a lump of stuff giving off heat, light, electrons, alpha particles and gamma rays, and even if it went critical it wouldn't be the end of the world. Well, it might be, but you'd just need to make it small and far away enough. Then it's just a portable sun and you can stick solar panels on everything.
nineteenthly, Jun 18 2009
  

       Hmmm did any one actually understand the idea... ? Ok in the style of a swedish pastery chief...   

       --- Take a portion of your favorite radioactive element and roll it out flat
--- Take a portion of a dissimilar metal that exhibits the 'Seebeck Property' (with respect to the radioactive element above) and roll flat
--- Press out sections of these metals with your cookie cutter
--- Place layer apon layer of metal sections into your tray and seal
  

       As you can see from the one I made earlier this is a thermal couple that does not require heating --- or in other words "radioative isotope coupled thermally for electrical potential"...
madness, Jun 19 2009
  

       //did any one actually understand the idea//
About as far as // 8 light second barrier //. Why so close?
coprocephalous, Jun 19 2009
  

       Indeed 8.3 light minutes even...
madness, Jun 19 2009
  

       I assume "coupled thermally for electrical potential" means using thermopiles (arrays of thermocouples) to generate electricity from the heat emitted by the decaying nuclear fuel. Presumably the cold nodes of the thermopiles would be dangled in space a little way from the monoliths, detracting somewhat from their monolithiness.   

       It all makes sense to me, but the language used is a little distracting.
Twizz, Jun 19 2009
  

       Lovely...
madness, Jun 19 2009
  

       What use is a battery that's 8.3 light minutes away?
zen_tom, Jun 19 2009
  

       //Jim is "confidant"// - who's passing him info?
lurch, Jun 19 2009
  

       This reminds me of a plutonium star idea I recently had. I didn't post it because it seemed so absurd.
Spaceman Spiff, Jun 21 2009
  

       //I didn't post it because it seemed so absurd.// [marked-for-tagline]
csea, Jun 21 2009
  

       [-] because 4 by 3 by 2 is silly. If the monolith was 1 by 4 by 9, it would be a different matter.
sninctown, Jun 21 2009
  

       Regarding batteries and nuclear waste: This is a letter that I received from our battery research department. Can anyone address the concerns: The nuclear battery concept has been around for some time. There is generally an immediate concern regarding potential leakage of radioactive material and the incumbent need for 100% hermetic sealing. This concern is heightened in battery applications, and especially for mobile and automotive uses, due to the risk of enclosure damage in the event of an accident. I recall there may also have been technical feasibility issues related to potential discharge rate limitations and performance degradation over time. This could reduce the potential number of applications and would effectively rule out automotive. If any of you are aware that the issues above, and other potential technical hurdles, have been resolved, I would be interested to learn more. Please feel free to forward any relevant data.
Jsebesta, Sep 23 2009
  

       //Please feel free to forward any relevant data//   

       Translation: "please feel free to do my research for me".
Custardguts, Sep 23 2009
  

       Depends how you define research. Research involves investigation to accomplish a clearly defined initiative. I am looking for nuclear waste applications that maybe applicable to the car industry. Mine is not clearly defined nor is it an issue. It is more or less a brainstorming.
Jsebesta, Sep 24 2009
  
      
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