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Protective Home Shroud

Whole-Home Enveloping Protective Shroud
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This is a giant kevlar/carbonfiber shroud meant to envelope and help protect an entire home from natural disasters - hurricanes, tornados, wildfires. (It probably can't protect against floods, because water would be able to seep under the shroud.) Shroud would be wrapped around 4 suitably tall telescoping poles to surround entire house, and would include roof covering. Your home is typically your costliest asset and your life investment. Its contents can include irreplaceable items precious to you and your family. If a natural disaster comes along with adequate warning, such as a hurricane or a wildfire, then you owe it to yourself to erect a home defense barrier that will keep your core dwelling safe. Investment in this kind of safety measure could also result in a discount on home insurance premiums. Shroud could also include photoelectric material to produce some solar power to keep home powered in the event of electrical grid outage from disaster.
sanman, Aug 31 2017

They're on it. http://www.insideed...id-hurricane-damage
[2 fries shy of a happy meal, Aug 31 2017]

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       Perhaps the walls and roof of the house should simply be built from the shroud-material.
Vernon, Sep 03 2017
  

       The shroud's probably going to be quite expensive - might be worth investing in another shroud to protect it from any damage
hippo, Sep 03 2017
  

       It's already possible to design and build tornado- and hurricane-proof dwellings. Making the same structure floodproof is more of a challenge, but not insurmountable. As for fires, again the same construction style is intrinsically fire resistant.
8th of 7, Sep 04 2017
  

       Why not make that envelope a lot bigger; put an alternative address on the outside of it, then post the whole house to a safer location until the risk passes? "A return to sender" will ensure that it comes back to the same location in due course.
xenzag, Sep 04 2017
  
      
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