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Pseudo gravity

Artificial Semi-Gravaity
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OK, I think I have come up with a practical Idea for gravity on the shuttle or other spaceborn crafts. It involves a powerful magnet and Iron-mesh lined clothing. I don't know alot about this but I've read that astronauts bones detirorate (sp?) while in space due to lack of gravity. So if they were to make a room in a ship were they could exersize while in iron mesh jump-suits while a powerful magnet pulls them down, simulating gravity. Know i know there are some problems, like lack of room, magnetic interference w/ instruments. But if they were to use some kind of technology (fiber optics?) that magnets don't effect maybe gravity throughout the shuttle? Is it to far-fetched?
davisz, Oct 16 2003

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       Fiber optics? ... that part kind of eludes me, but other than that, it SOUNDS half-baked to me ... [+]
Letsbuildafort, Oct 16 2003
  

       Haven't we been trying to stay out of harmful magnetic fields to prevent cancer?
HamiltonSniper, Oct 16 2003
  

       How about high-powered magnets in the boots and metal decks? I mean ... I dont know how powerful magnets have to be. Secondly it seems more simple to just have elastic bands attatched to your hips and attatched to the deck, pulling you 'down'. OR WAIT ... you could apply this to the whole ship by having 'rails' that would span the entire ship with wheels attached to them (like in a rollercoaster, so that they would be held in such a way they wouldn't become detatched from the rails) the wheels would be attatched to the elastic ... so you'd have the astronaut running around in between these elasto-rails. Maybe not the most efficient method but damned if it ain't funny.
DaGreengo, Oct 16 2003
  

       the magnetic field could be made out of millions of mobile (cell) phones
phlegm, Oct 16 2003
  

       [DaG] I think the point is to keep stress on all of your bones - something that won't happen with magnets on shoes.   

       [dav]I think this idea is interesting, but considering the amount of magnitism required... well it would be energy wasteful. I think a much easier solution is to spin the ship, like in 2001 and countless other sci-fi books/movies.
Worldgineer, Oct 16 2003
  

       You can only use fiber optics for communication. You need electricity for instrumentation (or at least to power the optics).
Detly, Oct 16 2003
  

       I think they had the right idea in 2001: A Space Odyssey. A large rotating ring.
Cedar Park, Oct 17 2003
  

       Needs an awful lot of power. Better just to line all surfaces with Velcro hooks and wear clothes covered in Velcro eyes. Brings new meaning to "If you could just tear yourself away from that monitor for a minute..."
Harry Mudd, Oct 17 2003
  

       [world] I think it would be easier to spin the astronauts. Then they’d get their exercise by trying to bring their arms in.
ldischler, Oct 17 2003
  

       It woouldn't just be shoes, like a jumpsuit. I guess it would be impractical if it's really that much to power it. A rotasting ring is also much cooler :)
davisz, Oct 17 2003
  

       Ah yes, good point [o]. Also, depending on how you generate the field as well (the geometry), the field could drop off as R^(-1), R^(-2), R^(-3), or, well, anything.
Detly, Oct 19 2003
  

       //I think it would be easier to spin the astronauts. Then they’d get their exercise by trying to bring their arms in/ /   

       This would surely cause excessive cranial expansion. An astronaut might lose an eye or something.
Tiger Lily, Oct 19 2003
  

       Lunch maybe?   

       The shoes, or in this case suit, will be attracted by magnatisum, but not the body within. The occupant of the magsuit will still suffer the ill effects of 0-G.   

       Magnetic shoes are a good idea; it makes sure no one floats around out of control, inside or out.
the great unknown, Sep 12 2007
  

       //I don't know alot about this but...// marked-for-tagline.
MaxwellBuchanan, Sep 12 2007
  

       the Medieval 'Brynje' s' / knitted metal ring protective suits of armor, could apply, - rather Heavy, at 20 kilos, or so, like a 'FAT Man's Suit', - ),, go through the Metal detector, in The AIRport, and your nose will bleed, from exciteidness, of Beeing Alive !!, in a physical, weighted Body !!,.   

       :-),   

       s.
sirau, Jul 07 2011
  

       Once again ignoring the nonsense immediately above.   

       The magnetic loading on the clothing would act to strengthen bones. You would have to custom design each jumpsuit so it had much less metal at the feet and more at the head/neck so the pull remained roughly constant (since magnetic fields drop off so quickly). That being said, you are probably looking at potentially dangerous magnetism levels to achieve an appriciable pull, and that would definitely screw up any electronics in the area.
MechE, Jul 07 2011
  

       Magnets are heavy! One of the first questions aerospace engineers ask themselves when they sit down at the drawing board is "how can I make this thing lighter?" If the thing is a big honking magnet included to induce artifical gravity, the answer is "I can't make this thing any lighter, and we don't need it, so it stays the hell on the ground where it belongs!"
Alterother, Jul 08 2011
  
      
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