h a l f b a k e r y
I like this idea, only I think it should be run by the government.

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Rate the Idea

Give the ideas a score instead of mere vote
  (+4, -13)(+4, -13)
(+4, -13)
  [vote for,
against]

The present system of voting in HB has just two descrete values: (neglecting the neutral vote which does not contribute) Either the idea is a hit (vote for), or it is a miss (vote gainst). Somewhat similar to digital signals (descrete values) either a "zero" or a "one". they do not incorporate the analog factor. What i'm trying to convey is that a person is only 51% approved with a particular idea, but he goes for the idea inspite of the fact that he did'nt like it 49%(not a negligible figure when compared with 51).

Simple Maths: Lets introduce the system of relative scores for the ideas having a range 0 thru 10. (decimal precission of 1 digit is allowed - ex 9.1 is allowed but not 9.11 like in fashion shows). This way we can get a whole range of emotions for the ideas. If you dont approve of it simply give it a "0". then the percentage of the scores can be taken with the denominator as the maximum possible score for the idea depending upon the number of voters. let say this idea gets a score of: 7.2 , 8.5 , 10.0 , 5.8, 0.0 , 9.9 we say that 6 voters have cast thier votes and the maximum possible score was 60.0 but the idea managed to get only 41.4 (sum total of the score given by different voters). so the percentage score for the idea would be 41.4*100/60 = 69%. hey we can even have fishbone scores for the same idea, we can negate the scores with respect to 100. for example if i got 69% in favor of my idea, it also means that i didnt get 31% in my favor, ==> 31% were against me. so this idea would get a 31% fishbone and a 69% bake!

sridhar236, Feb 07 2005

[link]






       Nah, let's keep it simple.
jutta, Feb 07 2005
  

       People would just put zeros an inordinate amount of times. Just like on IMDB. Power hungry people will ruin this idea, just like communism.
Blumster, Feb 08 2005
  

       I give this a -1 on the (-1 to 1) integer scale.
Worldgineer, Feb 08 2005
  

       This is already implemented: if an idea is very very good (score 9.5) you're more likely to vote than if it's only very slightly good. Thus by the law of large numbers, etc, fractional voting already exists. (Unless everybody already votes on every idea, which somehow I doubt.)
pottedstu, Feb 09 2005
  

       To avoid [Blumster]'s problem, the system would have to internally keep track of the frequency distribution of scores each user gives out. For example, if phundug has voted "0,0,0,0,0,1,2,6,7" on his previous votes, and now votes a "9", the system will have to record "+3 standard deviations" or whatever. And the total croissantage is a function of everyone's standard deviations, not their actual votes.
phundug, Feb 09 2005
  

       Alternatively, the halfbakery - with presumably a few simple alterations in some lines of code somewhere - could be made to respond to connected webcams on people's computers, and using farcial analysis heuristics, ascertain whether the first reading of an idea resulted in a look on the reader's face of pleasant surprise; instant distaste; or simply "eh?";
Ian Tindale, Feb 09 2005
  

       Ian, please put your clothes back on.
--Halfbakery Server, Feb 09 2005


Jutta certainly is quick with code implementations.
Worldgineer, Feb 09 2005
  

       This can already be done. For example, this idea with 2 votes for and 14 against is 14% bun and 85% bone. Now I cannot vote on it, or I will have to redo my math.
bungston, Feb 09 2005
  

       Bunbone ratios.
bristolz, Feb 09 2005
  

       Given a large enough statistical sample voting, I don't think the resulting figures would change much between the current and proposed system.
RayfordSteele, Feb 09 2005
  
      
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