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SmartBox

Thinking Tool Box
 
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My idea is basically this: a tool box in which each tool is held by a thin robotic arm, and groups of robotic arms (a different group for each type of tool) are in trays that automatically extend upon recieving a voice command from the person who wants to use a tool.

Simply say the name (or size) of the tool you want, and the computer sorts out the correct tool, extends the proper tray, and then the proper robotic arm. If you're not sure what tool you need for a particular task, simply scan whatever you're working on with the IR scanner (ok, maybe not IR, but there's scanners that can detect metal tools), and the computer automatically selects the most appropriate tool for the job.

Putting tools back is easy. Simply scan the barcode on the tool, and the box will retrieve it from your hand with the proper robotic arm. This will keep your box nice and neat, and will save you the hassle of rummaging through a drawer yourself. It could also be programmed to respond only to your voice, preventing your neighbor from stealing your tools.

This could be done, easily. With the same technology used in cell phones to dial a phone number by voice command, this would sort out a barcode number on a tool by voice command.

It might be expensive, of course, but you get what you pay for. Sure, the robotic apparatus will take up some extra space, but with everything so neatly and tightly organized, you may actually end up with more space than you had.

(edit) the Delux Model comes with a tutorial guide. Simply input the job you want to do, and it not only tells you what tools to use, but how to do the job most efficiently.

21 Quest, Jan 24 2006

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       "scalpel, nurse" <slaps knife>
po, Jan 24 2006
  

       21, what part of WIBNI do you not understand?
  

       I always found my tools under no 1 son's bed.
po, Jan 24 2006
  

       What do you mean, Po? This is easily obtainable, it's just not been done (to my knowledge). Have you seen the advances made in the robotics industry? This doesn't even require a very sophisticated computer compared to what exists today. If you can make a phone dial a specific number by voice command, you can make a toolbox select a tool. In fact, it's the same technology, just a different application. Each tool has a barcoded number, so it's just like voice dialing.
21 Quest, Jan 24 2006
  

       you didn't mention a mobile phone...
  

       <clears up kids lego and soldiers and stuff>
po, Jan 24 2006
  

       This could be used for anything from tools and toys, to guns and ammo for hunting and law enforcement.
21 Quest, Jan 25 2006
  

       The technology is future, but not that far future... it's original... I've never seen it in a movie... I can't think of any reason to fishbone this other than that I don't like it.
Oh well, guess that'll have to do.
moomintroll, Jan 25 2006
  

       The problem with robotic arms is that by the end of the movie, one or more have invariably latched on to your genitals.
bungston, Jan 25 2006
  

       Only if you tell the box "genitals". But hey,as we say in the military, don't ask don't tell.
21 Quest, Jan 25 2006
  

       I used to have one of these, but it suffered the wrath of my lightsaber when it gave me a c-clamp when I asked for the vice grips.
  

       Damn thing was right in the long run. The c-clamp would've actually worked better.
Zimmy, Jan 25 2006
  

       If the scanner paid attention to what you were doing it could actually tell you where the leftover bits were meant to go - or remind you at the appropriate time to put them back.
spidermother, Jan 26 2006
  
      
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