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Snorkelscopic

Can't find a proper slot for this one.
 
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A, fifteen to twenty foot,telescopic snorkle with a floatation device to keep the topside end out of the water.





That's about it.

Hot out of the oven -- I was planning on using this for my house aquatic (on a much larger scale) http://spot.colorad...ents/snorkelpr.html
[Leotardo Da Vinci, Oct 05 2004]

The house aquatic http://www.halfbake...e_20House_20Aquatic
[Leotardo Da Vinci, Oct 05 2004]

Snuba http://www.snuba.com/
uses a tank, and is flexible, not telescopic, with a little raft on the surface [monkeywidget, Oct 05 2004, last modified Oct 21 2004]

[link]






       I only see two problems....   

       You're breathing the same stale air being pushed up and down the column if you're in the first couple of feet of water....   

       And if you're deep enough to use all the length of the snorkel, the water pressure makes it impossible to inhale.   

       Other than that I like it....
normzone, Jan 15 2004
  

       //You're breathing the same stale air being pushed up and down the column if you're in the first couple of feet of water....// Use two tubes with valves, one for inhaling and one for exhaling. If you make them coaxial and have the intake at the center they can even act as heat exchanger.   

       Snorkeling more than a few feet deep is no good idea, even if you can still breath. The body and its fluids will be at the pressure of the surrounding water, but the ventilated part of your lung will be at regular pressure. The result is that blood plasma seeps through the mucous skin that lines the lungs.
kbecker, Jan 15 2004
  

       //The result is that blood plasma seeps through the mucous skin that lines the lungs.//   

       ouch, count me out.
babyhawk, Jan 15 2004
  

       Even with the device I posted Kbecker? Or would the compressor on this device pressurize your lungs enough to prevent the blood from seeping into your lungs?
Leotardo Da Vinci, Jan 15 2004
  

       Pretty widely done. Made one of these myself, was 8 ft long and pretty fun until someone sees the floating bottle used to keep the other end of the pipe up and yanks it up to examine it.   

       My lungs hurt thinking about it.
thelambs, Jan 15 2004
  

       There is no reason to breathe out through the tube- just put a valve at the bottom for exhaling. That way any water that gets into it would also be pushed out. Of course I just described the snorkel you can buy for skin diving, but then I guess the difference here would be the length of pipe.   

       Oops looks like kbecker already made that suggestion!
monkeywidget, Jan 16 2004
  

       Try it out.Let us know if you survive.
python, Jan 16 2004
  

       I tried it as a kid. worked ok sitting at bottom of 3' deep section. Hard sucking wind at 5' deep section. Below that it was really stressful. Just imagine lying on the floor with a stack of fish tanks on your chest about the same depth as you would like to go. That is how hard it is to breath.   

       Oh and at that age I had some pretty serious lung power from running and my experiments with swimming multiple pool lengths along the bottom of the pool.   

       I say do not try this at home.
DadManWalking, Jan 16 2004
  

       This definately does not work... The presssure makes it impossible to breathe after 3-4 ft.   

       Special compressors that run to regulators on long hoses are widely baked.
KLRico, Jan 30 2004
  

       //Even with the device I posted Kbecker? // If you breath compressed air it will work. But that is baked, even though the posted invention may be new technology.
kbecker, Jan 30 2004
  
      
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