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Strong Turing Test

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Just like regular (weak) Turing test except that the test begins as follows:

Examiner: I believe that you are a machine. Prove to me that you are a human.

Machine: *starts arguing back*

... This could also double as an entertaining game/exercise for real humans.

ixnaum, Sep 20 2017

The Bicentennial Man https://en.wikipedi...he_Bicentennial_Man
Award-winning story about a robot that wanted to be human (was made into a movie). [Vernon, Sep 21 2017]

Mitsuku, An AI chatbot that won some turing test awards http://www.mitsuku.com
[beanangel, Sep 22 2017]

[link]






       // Examiner: I believe that you are a machine. Prove to me that you are a human. //   

       Machine: <Cleese> Oh I'm sorry, is this a five minute argument, or the full half hour? </Cleese>
8th of 7, Sep 20 2017
  

       Applying the Chinese take-away test, machines are definitely crunchier than cat or human.
bigsleep, Sep 20 2017
  

       Extra-Strong Turing Test: convince the examiner that you are Turing. For extra credit, convince Turing that you are Turing.
pertinax, Sep 20 2017
  

       ring twice
Ian Tindale, Sep 20 2017
  

       Machine.... you are required to construct a replacement version of the Turing Test.
xenzag, Sep 20 2017
  

       Bun for pertinax.
RayfordSteele, Sep 21 2017
  

       "I bleed hemoglobin. Wanna sample?"   

       The main problem I see with the "Strong Turing Test"/Idea is that humans (not to mention all other life-forms) are biological machines, and that AI research appears to advance by copying yet-another feature of the human- brain/machine into computers. In the long run, we can expect the way both operate to become indistinguishable from each other.   

       So, exactly *why* does the Examiner need some entity to prove it is human? Is the Examiner suffering from prejudice and deserve to be jailed for irrelevant discrimination?
Vernon, Sep 21 2017
  

       Out of curiosity, how many average humans can pass a Turing test ?
8th of 7, Sep 21 2017
  

       Few. Where would a Borg land I wonder?   

       Examiner: "Hi, how are you feeling today?" Subject: "Feeling is irrelevant. We are Borg. You will be assimilated."
RayfordSteele, Sep 21 2017
  

       [link] to Mitsuku, and IA chatbot that has won some turing awards. A few hours of funny conversation so far. Amazingly she is written in a markup language, AIML.
beanangel, Sep 22 2017
  

       I expect there are loads of AI that understand sarcasm....
Ling, Sep 22 2017
  

       Yeah, loads.
Ian Tindale, Sep 23 2017
  

       // We are Borg //   

       Sp. "We are the Borg" (but at least you got the capital "B").   

       Spot on, [Ray]. At last, the message seems to be getting through.
8th of 7, Sep 23 2017
  

       Presumably, at some point in the future, computers will be asking us to prove we're machines.
MaxwellBuchanan, Sep 23 2017
  

       <Nathan Spring >   

       "Human beings are too intrinsically unreliable to ever effectively be replaced by machines."   

       </Nathan Spring>   

       So, you can't fool us ...
8th of 7, Sep 23 2017
  

       Every life form is a machine.
Ian Tindale, Sep 23 2017
  

       Not cats. Cats are not machines. If you disassemble a machine into its component parts, you can come back at a later time, reassemble it, and it will work exactly as before.   

       If you dismantle a cat, no matter how carefully you do it, and save all the pieces, it never works properly again - or indeed at all. Even if you rebuild it straight away.   

       We have a large data set to confirm this assertion. We repeat the experiment as frequently as possible; if the results change, we will announce the fact.
8th of 7, Sep 23 2017
  

       The trick is to do it sub-system by sub-system, and to keep notes. Assembly is the reverse of disassembly.   

       Also, try not to mix up the parts from different cats.   

       Oh, and the intestine is easier if you slide it over a long piece of stiff copper wire and bend it to shape; you can pull the wire out from either end once you're done.
MaxwellBuchanan, Sep 23 2017
  

       // The trick is to do it sub-system by sub-system, and to keep notes. //   

       We did that.   

       // Assembly is the reverse of disassembly. //   

       That was our initial assumption.   

       // Also, try not to mix up the parts from different cats. //   

       Ah, OK. We've tried it by keeping all the parts together. Still didn't work.   

       // Oh, and the intestine is easier if you slide it over a long piece of stiff copper wire and bend it to shape; you can pull the wire out from either end once you're done. //   

       Good tip, thanks.   

       When you've reassembled them, how do you get them to restart ? We borrowed Sturton's defibrilator, but when we pressed the button there was a terrific flash, then when the smoke finally cleared, all we found was a tooth, two claws, and a smouldering collar with a little bell on it.   

       Yet the calibration seal on the casing was intact. Very odd.
8th of 7, Sep 23 2017
  

       We have this big double-pole switch with an ebonite lever. No idea how it works - the technician handles that side of things. Seems to work best when the weather's stormy, for some reason.
MaxwellBuchanan, Sep 23 2017
  

       That must be where we've been going wrong.   

       Any idea where we can get one of those switches ?   

       Then all we need to do is collect some more cats, and wait for a thunderstorm.
8th of 7, Sep 23 2017
  

       Sorry, no. Ours was already there when we took ownership. But I'll ask some of the locals next time they do one of their pitchfork-and-torches visits. They're awfully rustic but very nice once you get to know them.
MaxwellBuchanan, Sep 23 2017
  

       //sub-system by sub-system//   

       I still think you might be rushing it.   

       Start with a bucket of elemental carbon, some pressurised tanks of hydrogen and oxygen and a collection of trace elements in fiddly zip-loc bags. Now connect the carbon atoms into chains. If you drop one, start again. In no time at all you'll have a single- celled gut faunum up and running (except you'll have to feed it by hand, obviously).
pertinax, Sep 23 2017
  

       // If you drop one, start again. In no time at all you'll have a single- celled gut faunum up and running.//   

       This is probably how gigantism started. Getting carried away with molecular chains under the expectation 'oh you'll soon grow into it'.
bigsleep, Sep 23 2017
  

       //At last, the message seems to be getting through.//   

       Nah. I still stand by my take. Just didn't need to repeat it. 24th century zombies, that's all. Odd that our drone embraces capitalist rather than communist ideals. Is there a software update due?
RayfordSteele, Sep 24 2017
  
      
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