Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Apply directly to forehead.

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Tightenable Plaster

Pull the cord for instant tightness
 
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A plaster (band-aid for you americans out there) only for finger wrappage, with a thin cord running through the middle (or maybe one through each side) that can be tightened so that your plaster will not constantly need to be undone/redone tighter every time it comes a bit loose. And that's my idea. Roll on the fishbones!

No seriously, give me a croissant.
modular, Sep 08 2003

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       Yeah, i think this is an excellent idea. Well done, stranger.
Hehehe...
modular, Sep 08 2003
  

       give you a + for that piece of silliness even though I loathe plasters and all I keep thinking about are tourniquets.
po, Sep 08 2003
  

       Put a piece of shrink tubing over the offending plaster. Then hold finger over a candle until the tubing shrinks. Band aid will never loosen again. (Keep glass with icewater at hand.)
kbecker, Sep 08 2003
  

       Around here, we use drywall.
RayfordSteele, Sep 10 2003
  

       No, not *maybe* one through each side, *definitely*! Through the middle is bad.   

       Never heard "plaster" before though. Nooo, I've been ignorantly using an americanism all these years!
RoboBust, Sep 11 2003
  

       band-aids for scrapes an' such, duct tape for open cuts.
Freefall, Sep 11 2003
  

       So if the injury starts jetting blood, just yank on the cord and you’ve got an instant tourniquet.
pluterday, Sep 11 2003
  

       Plaster is an Irishism, [Robobust], so if you aren't Irish, maybe you are using the acceptable term.
modular, Sep 14 2003
  

       Oh! That's a relief.
RoboBust, Sep 14 2003
  

       And earlier "...from Old English, medical dressing, and from Old French plastre, cementing material...", therefore the name plaster of Paris.
FarmerJohn, Sep 14 2003
  
      
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