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Ultrasonic Sous-Vide

Cooks Food Precisely While Sonicating It
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Ultrasonic Sous-Vide cooker -- because there's room in sous vide for improvement.

The Sous Vide cooker is a water bath intended to cook food over longer periods at a precisely maintained temperature.

Sonicating the food while it's being cooked Sous Vide will help flavours and seasonings infuse through the food better. It will also help to break down any tough fibers more quickly.

Since the food is already being subjected to the sous vide cooking process, there is room to help that process along using sonication for added benefit.

sanman, Jan 04 2014

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       Hmmmm...hedgehog.
4whom, Jan 04 2014
  

       what's "hedgehog" mean?
sanman, Jan 08 2014
  

       Sonic The
swimswim, Jan 08 2014
  

       Reads like a theory statement - "could help flavors", "could probably also".
normzone, Jan 08 2014
  

       // what's "hedgehog" mean?   

       [marked- for-something-or-other]
tatterdemalion, Jan 08 2014
  

       There - grammar fixed. :P
sanman, Jan 08 2014
  

       In Iceland, they have a dish called "fiskhrópaði" - literally "fish which has been shouted at".   

       It consists of fish (herring, I think) which is pickled in a mixture of salt and saltpeter. In preparing it, the women of the village shout and scream at the earthenware pots containing it, continuously, for three days. It's believed that the shouting tenderizes the fish and helps the pickling salts to penetrate it.   

       Preparing fiskhrópaði is seen as a therapeutic process, allowing the women to vent their anger and frustration. The dish is then eaten communally, supposedly fostering reconciliation and tolerance.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 08 2014
  

       //It consists of fish (herring, I think) which is pickled in a mixture of salt and saltpeter. In preparing it, the women of the village shout and scream at the earthenware pots containing it, continuously, for three days.//   

       Yeah, but it's really only prepared this way for the benefit of the tourists. If you ever go to Iceland, make sure look for a place that serves the “local” recipe, which uses ammonium chloride in lieu of plain table salt. Also, I usually prefer my fiskhrópaði “vel gert”, which means at least a week of curing.
ytk, Jan 08 2014
  

       Au contraire. I have eaten widely of the "tourist dishes" in Iceland, and fiskhrópaði is never amongst them. If you knew Icelanders, you'd understand.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 08 2014
  

       Well, to be honest I've never actually *been* to Iceland—the closest I've come is eating at a few restaurants in the Little Hafnarfjörður district of town.
ytk, Jan 08 2014
  
      
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