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WheresTheBox.com

Find the box.
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Every week we give clues and a story plot as to where we've hidden a box. Then, on Sunday the first person to find the box on our google map/street view overlay will win the box. This Logically leads to: WhatsInTheBox.com, where people bet in what's in a box.
goodmars, Jun 24 2009

Geocaching http://www.geocaching.com/
What "these people who go around looking for boxes" were doing. [jutta, Jun 24 2009]

[link]






       I met these people who go around looking for boxes that have specific GPS coordinates, trading materials in the found boxes to prove they were there, moving on and leaving the boxes, posting their finds on a website and calling it sport. This is a bit like that, but not really.
daseva, Jun 24 2009
  

       So, how is this different from the existing promotional treasure hunts?
jutta, Jun 24 2009
  

       That's geocaching, daseva. I wanted to try it once but didn't. Sort of like a treasure hunt used to be.
blissmiss, Jun 24 2009
  

       This is nice.
Pericles, Jun 25 2009
  

       Ok, check it out. What if you had Google Street do a super definition area for every new 'X', But the real 'x' is just a little tiny x that you have to find without hint. This way, you could mark 'X' on the big map, only visible up to a certian resolution, but it would be up to the users to scan the given area for the real 'x': a small quarter sized 'x' that some Google Street rep actually puts on the spot before the ultra high def scan. In this way, you still have an ''x' marks the spot' feel. Also, after a few hundred years of this, all the major cities will be entirely high def scans.*   

       * This anno flippantly presumes the possibility of doing super detailed images for current Google interfaces, and is probably erroneously calling them 'high def scans'.
daseva, Jun 25 2009
  

       PERICLES????? THE PERICLES?
blissmiss, Jun 25 2009
  

       This kind of thing is being done by enterprising promoters and advertising agencies to get the 'underground' word out about upcoming movies and albums, products that are about to be introduced, so forth. I think they call it 'interactive marketing.' It was done with the last Nine Inch Nails album (distributing cleverly hidden tickets to a VIP-only secret concert) and the movie Cloverfield (I think they hid some DVDs with 'extra footage' that wasn't in the theatrical release, don't quote me on that one), to site a couple of examples. It was also the reason half of NYC took cover in their 9/11 shelters after somebody had the bright idea to place little boxes with blinky lights along the freeway to promote Cartoon Network's Adult Swim.
Alterother, Jun 26 2009
  

       // It was also the reason half of NYC took cover in their 9/11 shelters...
I remember a bomb scare that had to do with lite-brite outlines of characters from "Aqua Teen Hunger Force", an "Adult Swim" program. But (a) this has nothing to do with "boxes" or treasure hunts, unless you count the signs themselves as treasures; (b) took place in Boston, not New York. (The campaign covered multiple cities; but only in Boston did it turn into a scare.)
  

       Are we remembering different events? If so, do you have a pointer to details about yours?
jutta, Jun 26 2009
  

       THE one and only, mexican made, born and raised... still not knowing what kept her away for so long.
Pericles, Jun 26 2009
  

       Called the Mooninites. And they had a way of dealing with Frylock's impenetrable scientific knowledge. Observe.   

       Inignot: You and your third dimension.   

       Frylock: What about it?   

       Inignot: Oh, nothing, it's cute. We have five. [Pause] Err: Thousand.   

       Inignot: Yes, five thousand.   

       Err: Don't question it.   

       Frylock: Oh, yeah? Well, I only see two.   

       Inignot: Well, that sounds like a personal problem.
daseva, Jun 26 2009
  
      
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