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Wine bottles with corkscrews embedded

Connect the cork to a cup with a thread (male screw), and modify the bottle neck outer surface to form another thread (female screw) for the cup to move along the outer surface of the bottleneck
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In other words,

1. Modify the outside shape of a wine bottle neck to form a male screw.

2. Make a cup with a plastic female screw to ride on it.

3. Connect the top of the cup with the cork, i.e., by a rope to connect the top of the cup with the bottom of the cork, or other means.

For example, to presever the tradition of having corcscrew screwed into the cork, one could connect the top of the cup with the actual cork by driving a screw through both the cup and the cork during the manufacturing process.

Inyuki, Jan 08 2010

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       Why didn't I think of that? But then again, this is why they invented wine bottles with screw tops also.
Jscotty, Jan 10 2010
  

       baked.
WcW, Jan 11 2010
  

       I think the design could be simplified. Imagine a 2-inch cylinder, closed at one end. Now imagine a corkscrew thread fixed to the inside of the closed end, so that it is coaxial with the cylinder and protrudes from the open end by maybe half and inch.   

       At the factory, the tip of the corkscrew is screwed into the cork (to hold it in place), at which point the open end of the cylinder screws down against the glass "collar" just below the top of the neck. (The bottle itself is completely normal.)   

       Now, if the purchaser continues to twist the cylinder, the cylinder can't move down any more, so the cork must come up. In the end, the cork winds up inside the cylinder with the screw running through it. Simples.   

       But aesthetically unacceptable. [-]
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 11 2010
  

       Also, it is really high time that wine bottles were standardized into maybe half a dozen shapes and colours, and reused like milk bottles instead of being wastefully crushed and recycled. Fancy screwey shapes would be a pain in the neck.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 11 2010
  

       Nothing to say that such a device could not be adhered to the top of a very conventional bottle using a heat release adhesive. None of the current screw out "corks" utilize an "organic" (read: cork bark based) closure, all use some form of poly, although some now use the new breathable foam poly that is supposed to allow some ingress of O2. The basic concept is very well worked out.
WcW, Jan 11 2010
  

       Good luck with that [Maxwell]. How is the dairy doing?
normzone, Jan 11 2010
  

       In the UK, the dairy industry is doing fine, and has been recycling its bottles for many decades, thanks.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 11 2010
  

       Are people consuming THAT much wine to make recycling the bottles economical?
Cuit_au_Four, Jan 12 2010
  

       what is the minimum volume required to recycle? 1 would be my guess. Recycling wine bottles requires that the product have either an immediate turn over (no aging on the part of the consumer) or an acceptance that the label on the bottle be replaceable. Dispensing wine into unlabeled unmeasured containers for the purpose of off site consumption is currently illegal in the US. Beer may be sold that way, but not as it currently stands, wine.
WcW, Jan 12 2010
  

       The problem with reusing wine bottles is that all the wine is made and bottled in Spain, France, Italy, New Zealand, Australia, etc., and then drunk in the UK, so you have to transport the 'empties' a long way and the collection and transfer of the bottles back to the vineyard would involve many organisations. Reusing milk bottles (and yes, we still get milk deliverd to our doors in glass bottles) works because the bottles are collected from the doorstep by the milk delivery company who will transport them a short distance before reusing them themseleves.
hippo, Jan 13 2010
  

       <insufferablySmug>
Maybe you just need to move closer to a wine region, [hippo].
</iS>
  

       Here in the South-West of Australia, especially in a glut year like this one, a lot of wine is sold off cheap in 'cleanskin' bottles, which would be especially easy to recycle. Pity no-one actually does (I mean, not directly, in the way envisaged here) ...
pertinax, Jan 13 2010
  

       //Are people consuming THAT much wine to make recycling the bottles economical?//   

       Depends on the level of civilisation. Europeans will tend to drink a bottle or so per houselhold per day.   

       [hippo] That is a very good point of which I hadn't thought. But transfer betweenn European countries by sea/land might not be prohibitive.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 13 2010
  

       When I lived in France, you took your empties back to the supermarket, and put them into a machine that printed a voucher for the deposit refund on the bottles you had returned, so yes, I guess it was economical to recycle. OTOH, they didn't sell anything but French wine, so I suppose the glass didn't have far to go.
coprocephalous, Jan 13 2010
  

       Yes, although it may still be rendered uneconomic by the need to make it profitable for more than one company and to run a collection operation. Milk bottles are collected by the same company that delivers milk and then reused by that company. Wine bottles would have to be collected from central locations where wine-drinkers deposit them - supermarkets, for example - by a company which would distribute them to the end-user, vineyards. This company would have to make a profit somehow and I'm not sure the cost of a new glass bottle is high enough to be able to make a profit out of collecting bottles and selling them back to vineyards.

[pertinax] The south of England *is* a wine region, just not a high-volume wine region.
hippo, Jan 13 2010
  

       //The problem with reusing wine bottles is that all the wine is made and bottled in Spain, France, Italy, New Zealand, Australia, etc., and then drunk in the UK, so you have to transport the 'empties' a long way...//   

       Or the UK could send them to Northern Ireland, where they could be filled with petrol.
ldischler, Jan 13 2010
  

       //Or the UK could send them to Northern Ireland, where they could be filled with petrol.//
I am so glad that I just finished a small sip of wine before reading that.
Ling, Jan 13 2010
  

       //Depends on the level of civilisation. Europeans will tend to drink a bottle or so per houselhold [sic] per day.//   

       By that logic, [MB], the zenith of civilization is a shoddily dressed and smelly old man passed out by the dumpster behind the circle k.
MikeD, Jan 13 2010
  

       I did not specify a linear relationship.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 13 2010
  

       We consider that a small pyrotechnic device would be infinitely preferable to all that fiddling round with corkscrews.
8th of 7, Jan 13 2010
  

       //houselhold [sic] // sp.: hic
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 13 2010
  
      
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