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World wide standard safe plugs

Round Plugs
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Round plugs to fit into round plug sockets. The 3 prongs would only fit it the hole if the plug was rotated to a certain position. When the plug is removed a spring load door slides down within the plug hole casing, making it saver for children, would also be the same around the whole world so there would be no need to take plug adaptors abroad.
gizmo, Feb 22 2002

Pop Plug http://www.halfbakery.com/idea/PopPlug
rayfo's related idea, with related debate [goff, Feb 27 2002, last modified Oct 17 2004]

[link]






       Remarkably similar to UK plug sockets then where the Earth pin (the top pin) goes in first and cuases the cover protecting the other 2 sockets 2 lift up...   

       Actually, basically this *IS* the UK plug socket.
CasaLoco, Feb 22 2002
  

       That's all nice and fine, but who would be willing to pay for it? Not me. fishbone
Sulla 's Ghost, Feb 22 2002
  

       It only costs a couple of punds for a british socket, which is very similar to the design here, as pointed out by CasaLoco.
[ sctld ], Feb 22 2002
  

       I don't think I have explained this one too well. It doesn't look anything like our normal plug. More on the style of a larger telephone socket, only round. The three pins are not sticking out, but within the cylinder. A drawing would be better, but I don't know how to load one.
gizmo, Feb 23 2002
  

       Kind of like a tv aerial plug?
[ sctld ], Feb 23 2002
  

       Sort of, but when it is removed the wall socket has a drop down door to hide the holes for the pins, to prevent things being poked into them.
gizmo, Feb 23 2002
  

       Look at the first anno by CasaLoco - Only hole 'open' is the Ground. It's the Good Guy.
thumbwax, Feb 24 2002
  

       These exist in Australia. They're not standard, but you can have them installed.
QuadAlpha, Feb 26 2002
  

       Look... just make the UK sockets the world standard and be done with it. The only thing I would like to see is the addition of a RCD in the socket. (These are available but not standard)
CasaLoco, Feb 26 2002
  

       I think the north-american plugs are pretty good, the eletrical part is to far in and too thin for much to be poked into them. (but im sure everybody pefers thier local outlet to anybody elses) i like the automatic-Block idea, its good if you had infants... or stupid kids ~~i-mer thinks back to grade 9 drama class when his freind got bored and tried to put a stick in the electrical outlet...~~ aah the good ol'days...   

       anyway this shoulda been an idea that came out before electricity was avalibal to everyone, becuase if we try and update our plugs now, we're all gonna need new lamps, tv, blenders, micro-waves... well you get the idea. i suggest you build a time machine and suggest it this to the people of the past...
i-Mer, Feb 27 2002
  

       American plugs terrify me. They work when the plug's halfway out, and unlike British plugs the pins have no plastic coating over the top half of them, so it would be easy to touch an electrically live pin. Plus they wobble like anything, and don't fit particularly securely into the socket.
pottedstu, Feb 27 2002
  

       I think we had a discussion like this in one of [rayfo]'s ideas. (Where is he, by the way? I hope he's OK.)
angel, Feb 27 2002
  

       Some years back the UK changed from round pin plugs to the square pin safety plugs. The only real cost is in replacing the sockets.   

       You did not, (as [i-Mer] stupidly suggests) have to buy new lamps, microwaves, tv's etc, you simply unscrewed the plug (or cut it off for moulded on plugs) and screw a new plug on.
CasaLoco, Feb 27 2002
  

       [angel] we did have this debate on one of rayfo's ideas - pop plug. See link.
goff, Feb 27 2002
  

       Having recepticle plugs to the side of an outlet's midline makes it possible to make a nearly jack-proof but still useable outlet by way of a hinged or sliding slotted cover. These aren't currently produced with integrated circuit breakers, to my knowledge, although many varieties of secure covers are available for indoor and particularly outdoor use.   

       Second the intimations about general acceptance of anything -- not likely.
Second second the wherearounds of ¯rayfo?
reensure, Feb 27 2002
  

       \\\American plugs terrify me. They work when the plug's halfway out, and unlike British plugs the pins have no plastic coating over the top half of them, so it would be easy to touch an electrically live pin. Plus they wobble like anything, and don't fit particularly securely into the socket.///   

       Hahahahaaa sledgehammer engineering!
Madcat, Oct 03 2003
  

       Isn't part of the reason plugs are different around the world so that plugs cannot be inserted into electrical outlets with different voltages and frequencies? I'm not sure what the household voltage is in UK, but I'm thinking 230V 50hz.. Here in US it's 115V 60Hz. The wrong power could wreak havac in *some devices.
swamilad, Oct 05 2003
  
      
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