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'spellcheck' Ink pen

you write while the pen corrects your bad grammarrrr and spelling
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A small window on the side of the writing instrument translates the words as you write them. When you misssspell a word, the correct spelling appears in the display window on the pen itself and if you write a run-on sentence, it suggests a grammatically correct version. Your checks and thank you cards will never make you look like an incompetent fool ever again.

I could uses one rite now.

julien, Aug 14 2000

Write on smart paper http://www.halfbake...0on_20smart_20paper
Another way to spell-check handwriting [beauxeault, Aug 14 2000, last modified Oct 17 2004]

exploding pen http://www.halfbake...heck_27_20Ink_20pen
more extreme version [egnor, Aug 14 2000, last modified Oct 17 2004]

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       Alternatively, a tiny little gyroscope inside the pen is connected to a real-time spelling error prevention circuit and makes it physically harder to misspell a word.
jutta, Aug 14 2000
  

       right on. I need you around to complete all my thoughts. hahahah
julien, Aug 14 2000
  

       Would have to be an eraseable pen...   

       And one that tried to translate my writing would barf it's little gyro up...
StarChaser, Aug 15 2000
  

       I wouldn't like I gyro pen if it meant I couldn't flip it around my fingers anymore.
centauri, Aug 29 2000
  

       Hasn't it occurred to anyone that the more we would use these spell & grammar checker type systems, the less we actually use our own inbuilt one?   

       I for one will admit to having become a little lazy in remembering the spelling of a word since programs like Word have featured the ability to automatically replace miss-spelled words with correctly spelled ones.
Alcin, Sep 01 2000
  

       I never use spellcheckers, I spell well enough myself...If I'm really unsure of a word, I'll check that one particular one, but usually in a manual spellchecker, i.e. a dictionary.
StarChaser, Sep 01 2000
  

       Word snobs amuse me. ...besides, those of us blessed with dyslexia could seriously benefit from this loot err, tool.
julien, Sep 05 2000
  

       <grin> I didn't intend to be a snob...I learned to read when I was 2...
StarChaser, Sep 06 2000
  

       okay, you big show-off. harhahrhar
julien, Sep 18 2000
  

       Two? Well, I suppose that's interesting in some circles. Personally, of course, I was doing translations of Pindar for Penguin Classics at eighteen months, and at two could tear phone books in half telekinetically. My own memory grows rather hazy before age four, but I read in accounts of the period that I soon gave up philology as trivial and swore off exercising my psychic powers because of the barrier they presented to my own socialization.
Monkfish, Nov 27 2000
  

       Pindar? I remember finding his poetry a little light for my tastes roughly twenty minutes after conception, so I began translating Leucippus' natural philosophy via telepathy. This naturally led me toward his sources in pre-Mycenean cultures, so I deciphered Linear B while being born. Would have had it sooner, but they induced labor, which I found terribly inconvenient.   

       Like Monkfish, I gave up on philology as too twee and now spend most of my time calculating how many licks it takes to get to the center of a Tootsie-Roll pop.
Uncle Nutsy, Nov 28 2000
  

       About that pen. I had an automatic spelling pen at age five. When it made a mistake a wooden ruler would crack my knuckles with robot-like precision. A machine called a nun operated the ruler. By age five and a half I was selected to take dictation for the Pope - I forget which one.
rayfo, Dec 05 2000
  

       Well, I was Pope from age three to age four and a half, and I have no recollection of that. Before my time, I should think.
Monkfish, Dec 05 2000
  

       Ah, Monkfish and Nutsy, where have all the really smart people gone? <sighs>
pluterday, May 24 2003
  

       *ahem*   

       Ha ha, fart smeller.   

       I like that idea.   

       The pen, I mean.
rooney, Dec 14 2003
  


 

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