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a breviate processor

iwicstiafl
 
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(please see the edit at the bottom of this idea)

In the word processor, I type aaa. I'm in the abbreviate mode. I write iwi and it shows me
-- I wish I / I wonder if /
As I advance the app sees the context and can offer better quick completion according to my previous writing and the current topic. So currently it doesn't offer (yet) "I would identify..."

Now I added the letter c, so it has "I wish I could" but also (not shown yet, waiting to see if this is getting personal) "I wonder if Charly / Catherine / Carrasso"

I quickly complete the sentence: iwicstiafl...
and presto:
I wish I could say this in a few
letters / languages / lists

I press backspace it marks a word and I can change the spelling from the first letter and on. If the new spelling caused the rest of the word to be unintelligible, it erases the rest of the word and gives suggestions for the sentence.

Pressing Delete erases the word and goes to the next one. Quickly double-pressing the delete, deletes the rest of the sentence.

zzz and I'm back to regular writing mode.

nnn and I'm in numbers. (With a Numpad on mobile)

### and I'm in characters.

iii and I'm in emogies.

[edit]
The differences between this and the existing and aggravating autocomplete and abbreviation keyboards are few but important:

When the Breviator is on, it does NOT autocomplete and does NOT take from a preconceived bank of texts. Rather, it

a. waits to see a large portion of or even the whole sentence. Which leaves much fewer chances to err.

b. only when hitting the period the suggested text is entered. Since you arent typing words but only a few letters for the whole sentence, there's not much loss or fuss if it has no good suggestions.

c. it learns from your typing, so the next suggestions will be better and there will be fewer cases where it gets it all wrong.

d. deleting and changing is intuitive. Going back does not delete but rather allow change. Deletion is from the current location and on.

e. and if you start typing a real word it could allow you to use the word you typed as the text, by pressing the space. No auto-correction and nobody hurt.

tyfrtp a ihylti

pashute, Feb 10 2020

The Devil's Keyboard Options https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT207525
I have all of these turned off. [Chairborne Hero, Feb 10 2020]

[link]






       Baked, WKTE. And I hate it with a passion - I've disabled every text shortcut, auto-complete, predictive, "smart" feature I can on all of my home and office devices.   

       I prefer to make my own typos, please and thank you.
Chairborne Hero, Feb 10 2020
  

       What [CH] said.
8th of 7, Feb 10 2020
  

       No. Not what CH said. This idea is NOT about pre-written text abbreviations, and NOT about text completion as they are (aggravatingly) known to us now. The differences are few but important:   

       1. Pressing aaa turns the Breviator on and zzz turns it off. Default: OFF.   

       2. When the Breviator is on, it does NOT autocomplete and does NOT take from a preconceived bank of text. Rather, it   

       a. waits to see a large portion of or even the whole sentence. Which leaves much less chances to error.   

       b. only when hitting the period the suggested text is entered. Since you arent typing words but only a few letters for the whole sentence, there's not much loss or fuss if it has no good suggestions.   

       c. it learns from your typing, so the next suggestions will be better, and there will be less cases where it gets it all wrong.   

       d. deleting and changing is intuitive. Going back does not delete but rather allow change. Deletion is from current location and on.   

       e. and if you start typing a real word it could allow you to use the word you typed as the text, by pressing the space. No autocorrection, and nobody hurt. (adding this to the idea)
pashute, Feb 12 2020
  

       Then "half" baked or less, building on a technology I've already come to hate? That's what I'd call a tough sell. Your description sounds even LESS convenient and harder to train than Apple's predictive typing.
Chairborne Hero, Feb 12 2020
  

       Hi chair. Sorry, but I think that kind of criticism was given on the mouse at IBM and on the fax at Xerox.   

       The Breviator ad will read: The correct autocorrect. Only when you want it. Most people I know do use Grammarly and like it, which proves that this kind of a service is definitely needed.
pashute, Feb 20 2020
  

       // which proves that this kind of a service is definitely needed //   

       No, it proves that better education is needed.
8th of 7, Feb 20 2020
  

       I know the CEO of Grammarly. Nice guy mostly. I never believed he would succeed to the extent that he has with this product.
theircompetitor, Feb 20 2020
  

       That's probably because you underestimated the potential value of very stupid people in huge numbers.
8th of 7, Feb 20 2020
  
      
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