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anonymous browsing with user end accounting

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I am a computer forensics student and i just downloaded tor for the first time.I typed in netflix.com and then closed it with no immediate intention of opening it again. Why? I suppose as much as i like privacy from advertisers ans other snoops, I like leaving an auditable trail of my actions. I like knowing that if i were to see something i shouldn't online my web browser has records of how i got there and they keywords that led me. Whereas stumbling on to something bad with Tor. seems less accidental it would suggest to an outsider that you are using Tor to hide your criminal activity. So my idea is this. A secure onion browser that leaves no digital trail online but creates a tamper-proof record of your doing stored locally on your computer. That way if you had to prove something in court you would have exculpatory evidence on your side.
bob, Jun 12 2016

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       the record is on your computer so any prosecutor is likely to question it's credibility.. the tamper-proof bit is going to have to be pretty persausive
Skewed, Jun 12 2016
  

       / A secure onion browser /   

       What is that ?   

       Google reveals: "The name is derived from an acronym for the original software project name "The Onion Router". Tor directs Internet traffic through a free, worldwide, volunteer network consisting of more than seven thousand relays to conceal a user's location and usage from anyone conducting network surveillance or traffic analysis."   

       This onion thingy sounds like a make work project for somebody.
popbottle, Jun 12 2016
  

       huh.. just re-read your reasons for wanting an end user log   

       if your using TOR no one without direct access to your computer should know where you've been anyway.. if you don't keep a log of pages visited they shouldn't be able to find out by seizing your computer either (assuming you don't actually save any dodgy pictures or what have you.. in which case no amount of proof you only found them "by accident" will help)   

       so the idea seems a bit defunct for the purpose stated   

       unless you're worried someone has a long range lens pointed at your screen (so close the curtains) or suspect you have someone hacked into your PC through your Wi-Fi (or tapped into your homes landline) it seems a bit pointless   

       which begs the question.. what can you possibly be involved in that makes you think anyone might go to those lengths to spy on you?
Skewed, Jun 12 2016
  

       [bob] belongs to an on-line community with highly dangerous ideas, and some involving custard.
pertinax, Jun 13 2016
  

       Client-side logs will not "prove" you are innocent, as client- side logs are easily altered or fabricated.   

       The log is only as good as the trust placed in the logging agent.   

       So, are you just looking for bookmarks/history for you to use yourself for convenience? Well, I thought all browsers, even TOR type, would have that as a feature already.
sophocles, Jun 13 2016
  

       This harms plausible deniability of access for everyone else, so [-]
Voice, Jun 14 2016
  

       That would shrink the global economy, if it functions,   

       from a China perspective, personally emotively felt autocensorship based on maintaining uncontroversial logs blocks google, a 200 or 300 billion US$ company, while Harpers magazine says there was 27 million us$ of cybercrime, that blocks 100 billion$ of expansion to "preserve" .01% of that value at even 30 million us$ of naughtyness averted. also, who says google is actually naughty?
beanangel, Jun 17 2016
  
      
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