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brakes=accelerate

use braking power to to compress air the for the engine
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Excuse me because i dont know much about this proccess but i do know that it can be done. My idea is to use braking power to compress air that can be forced into the engine upon accelleration. You would only need about 5-10 seconds of boost before a turbocharger could kick in.Unfortunately i dont know how much air braking power can produce. But thats just about the only problem i see in this idea. Theres probably a whole bunch im to stupid to figure out. But, hey, whats a 13 year old to do??
gearhead13, Jul 27 2003

This one's a bit of a Halfbakery Chestnut http://www.google.c...r%3A%22&btnG=Search
Google search shows that this idea (and friends) comes up with some regularity on HB... [land, Jul 09 2006]

Dynamically reconfigurable internal combustion engine http://www.freshpat...hp?type=description
Possibly what [DeathNinja] was too lazy to find. [land, Jul 09 2006]

[link]






       This is baked but I'm too lazy to find a link
DeathNinja, Jul 28 2003
  

       5 to 10 seconds?? how big of a turbo are you thinking of? mine kicks in almost immediately around 2,500rpm with about 5lb boost at 5,200
tazmase2, Jul 28 2003
  

       It's not bad thinking at 13, but if you do a web search for the term "regenerative braking," you'll find all kinds of technologies for storing braking energy for later use.
beauxeault, Jul 28 2003
  

       around these parts that would be considered a successful test
DeathNinja, Jul 28 2003
  

       Energy return systems have been tried using air (light, abundant, no positive thrust), hydraulic fluid (heavy, slow, friction/viscosity loss, positive thrust), mechanical springs (if it breaks it could easily kill someone) and of course electrical (expensive) Take a look at the Honda Dualnote
WhiteWiz, Mar 01 2004
  

       WhiteWiz has a point, this is not too new of an idea. It's been tried a lot in a lot of different ways and none of them seem to stick for too long. But hey it's thinking like this that will get you to invent something truly original. But yeah ... it's been done.
williamruck, Jul 07 2006
  

       Brake Horse Power?
wagster, Jul 07 2006
  

       I think this isn't about regen braking so much as a way to enhance performance without having to carry compressed air.   

       [13], you need to think about what "braking power" really is. When you brake a conventional car you are turning the car's kinetic energy into frictional heat by squeezing the brake pads and discs together. Taking the kinetic energy away from the car is what slows it down.   

       Regenerative braking couples the spinning axle to a DC generator / battery set, transforming the KE into stored electrical energy that can be used.   

       For your idea to work you would have to somehow make the spinning axle do work on the air to compress it. One obvious way is to couple a compressor to the axle.   

       So your homework is:   

       1) how much compressed air at what pressure do you need to get effective turbocharger preformance?   

       2a) how much air could you compress at what pressure if you brake a car from 60 mph to a stop? 30 mph? Assume 70% compressor efficiency.   

       2b) how much braking would you have to do for the scheme to work?   

       There, now you have a killer paper or project for physics class.
strange606, Jul 07 2006
  

       //Brake Horse Power?//   

       That means something completely different but I bet you know that.
strange606, Jul 07 2006
  

       Of course - it's the amount of power it takes to break a horse into at least two pieces.
zen_tom, Jul 07 2006
  

       [+] because I like anything that tries to save some of the energy we waste heating up our brake rotors. And this despite the fact that I find that this idea is nothing like new, even on HB.   

       Dr. [strange606] has given [gearhead13] a pretty serious load of homework. But, because it's summer now, and [gearhead13] has a lot of free time on his or her hands, allow me to add that you'd need to store and cool that air before injecting it into your engine. So figure out how you'd store it and cool it, and you're a little closer to true bakitude.   

       I expect to see your idea on late-night TV pretty soon.
land, Jul 09 2006
  
      
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