Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Still more entertaining than cricket.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                                           

caffeine vapor

caffein inhaling mechanism
  (+6, -7)
(+6, -7)
  [vote for,
against]

The American work ethic is infamous around the world and the almost non-existance of vacations compared with Europe indicates the enthusiasm of Americans for working their asses off with small increase in compensation for extra effort. But the coffee break eats into this general ambience so to eliminate this it should be possible to create nanoparticles of coffee dispersed by an office humidifier so that workers are continuously energised by breathing in caffein.
JSand, Jan 28 2007

Some info on pulmonary drug delivery http://pubs.acs.org...ch/97/dec/deep.html
About 3/7ths the way down for the optimal size reference. [daseva, Jan 28 2007]

[link]






       It would be impossible to standardise the dose, it could interfere with medication and it would prejudice against people who choose to avoid caffeine. Also, caffeine is a solid, so it would have to be dissolved in something and be distributed as a vapour, which would mean coffee or caffeine would precipitate onto solid surfaces, making everything sticky and probably breaking office equipment.   

       However, an implant or mainlining caffeine might work.
nineteenthly, Jan 28 2007
  

       Water _cooler_ => _warm_...liquid?
nineteenthly, Jan 28 2007
  

       I hear casinos pump oxygen into their gambling halls to keep you awake and broke. Maybe there is something here..   

       Coffee nanoparticles can easily be encapsulated in a solid polymer shell, avoiding the precipitation problems and also controlling the release rate of the caffein. Though, I would just nix the coffee and make a caffein dry powder that could be dispersed in the air.
daseva, Jan 28 2007
  

       It still doesn't solve the problem of not having any way to regulate the dose. A controlled release rate from an arbitrary number of particles over an arbitrarily long time is still an uncontrolled dose. I have chosen not to have any xanthines at all and this would violate that choice. People on particular medications, such as bronchodilators, some antidepressants and various other drugs, are supposed to avoid caffeine. In any case, it's medication without consent.
nineteenthly, Jan 28 2007
  

       Particle concentration in the air can be easily controlled, hense avoiding your arbitrariness. Of couse, breathing rates will vary, but I would suspect little deviation in an office setting.   

       But, yes, medication without consent is definitly a bad thing. Perhaps, a caffein room. [+/-]
daseva, Jan 28 2007
  

       OK, thanks for conceding that, [GumBob].   

       However, it is still arbitrary because of factors like volume of distribution (e.g. body weight and amount of fat), basal metabolic rate and genetically determined differences in liver enzymes. Maybe a caffeine room would be good, like a smoking room. However, would caffeine actually be absorbed by the lungs? Come to think of it, it probably would, because the very similar theophylline can be administered by inhaler. How much would the air be able to carry? It would also avoid the first pass effect if inhaled, so it would be more powerful per unit than caffeine absorbed via the digestive tract, and one of the first organs it would reach would be the heart, so there would be quite a high dose at one of the most strongly affected organs. On the other hand, there wouldn't be any cafecrol, so the cholesterol would be unaltered.   

       A caffeine inhalation room is interesting, because of the parallel with tobacco.
nineteenthly, Jan 28 2007
  

       Ha!
wagster, Jan 28 2007
  

       Optimal particulate diamters for absorption by the deep lung are between 1 and 3 micrometers (looking for the reference), so we wouldn't necessarily need the nanotech either. I doubt these particles would suspend in the air by themselves, but maybe all we would need is an oscillating fan to keep them afloat.
daseva, Jan 28 2007
  

       I believe that what you purpose is possible in a concentrated and enclosed area... but I just don't believe there's a market for something like this. Plus, people drink coffee and take breaks so they can be social and break away from the mundane work they have to deal with--even if it is only for half an hour.
fred2386, Jan 28 2007
  

       Doesn't a seperate caffiene inhaling room defeat the whole point of this idea?   

       If you have to get away from your desk to inhale caffiene, you might as well just go and drink a cup of coffee or can of softdrink, that way you wouldn't get caffiene dust all over you either.   

       Also, I agree with [fred2386], breaks are healthy, no-one likes to work for 8 hours straigh (hell, thats why I'm here) ;)
emjay, Jan 29 2007
  

       JSand, I think you're onto something with this. But, maybe instead of forcing everybody to inhale this stuff, maybe put it in individual inhalers, like the ones used by those with asthma (did I spell that right?).
21 Quest, Jan 29 2007
  

       I was thinking of the separate caffeine room to be somewhere people stayed in all day, presumably getting steadily more aggressive and shaky, along the lines of smoking and non-smoking compartments on a train or a cafe, not like a smoking room where one just goes to smoke.
nineteenthly, Jan 29 2007
  

       I give this a fishbone just because I take my vacations ten minutes at a time at the coffee maker...
energy guy, Jan 29 2007
  

       It'd probably make the days seem longer too, because time might seem to pass more slowly due to the stimulant effect, and there would be office rage too.
nineteenthly, Jan 30 2007
  

       This wouldn't fly anywhere that Mormons work.
discontinuuity, Jan 30 2007
  

       or just ensure you've got a pseudo-nurse walking around from cubicle to cubicle, randomly shooting caffeine doses into people's necks. Also add guardian with a whip in case of worker resistance.
sweet, Jan 31 2007
  

       Or forget the nurse and just get the guy with a whip. Productivity will soar.
Veho, Jan 31 2007
  

       Or get a nurse with a whip. You may be able to charge the workers extra.
jutta, Feb 01 2007
  

       Just the injection please, [jutta]. Being whipped isn't really my cup of tea. Nor my syringe of tea.
pertinax, Feb 02 2007
  

       Do Mormons forswear all sources of caffeine though, or is it just coffee and tea? What about cola, Pro Plus, mate or guarana? What about the medical use of caffeine?
nineteenthly, Feb 02 2007
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle