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email diary

email sent to foo@bar.com is automatically formatted and appended to a web page
 
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like the 1994 "graffiti wall" scripts. but input is much more convenient.

so many uses.... diary, journal, group brainstorming, turn-based word games, even halfbakery!

gnormal, Mar 05 2001

WikiWikiWeb http://c2.com/cgi/wiki
[egnor, Mar 05 2001, last modified Oct 04 2004]

Open DIary http://www.opendiary.com
This is a web-based diary resource... a little different than what you have described, though. [pnewp, Mar 05 2001, last modified Oct 04 2004]

Blogger http://www.blogger.com
[rebekkahshiri, Mar 05 2001, last modified Oct 04 2004]

[link]






       Any web-archived mailing list already pretty much does that, doesn't it?   

       For most things, communication isn't write-only. If the reading is over the web, doing the writing on another channel (rather than with web forms) is more complicated. So why would you want to do it this way?
Is this mostly about HTML textareas being difficult to use? Or about integration with other newssources?
  

       If the latter, one could build a generic mail-to-web gateway that supports POST. For an e-mail sent to <id>@e2wgate.com, a template is looked up for <id>, the mail is parsed according to the template, and the parsed-out strings are substituted into a new template that forms a HTTP request, and a response is sent back.   

       Egnor, while wikiweb is a very simple collaborative database, I didn't know they had an email interface. (The perl script seemed kind of small for that.) Care to elaborate?   

       I wonder what email _actually_ gets sent to foo@bar.com   

       [update Jan 2002: I sent e-mail to the owner of the "bar.com" domain, asking whether he ever did anything with foo@bar.com. This is his reply (quoted with permission):   

       "once upon a time, long long ago in an Internet far away, i actually answered those test messages to foo@bar.com -- as "The Foo", a curmudgeon who delighted in surprising system testers with odd quirky messages. now, the Foo gets about 5000 messages a day -- either spam or test messages -- and the Foo is overwhelmed (and thus in retirement).   

       "right now all the messages are automagically forwarded into a gizmo that looks for email servers that are open for relay (providing spammers a platform to launch gazillions of messages for free). the gizmo maintains a realtime list of those servers that is used as part of a larger spam filtering gizmo.   

       "some day i may write a more elaborate spam filter that will analyze all that mail and create black-hole lists of things like; spam-advertised URL's, admin contacts of spammers, etc.   

       "but that's probably just a pipe-dream -- mostly what i do is work on restoring my farm (www.haven2.com/farm) to native habitat, and make furniture.   

       "best,   

       "mike (aka The Foo)"]
jutta, Mar 05 2001
  

       foo@bar.com - 9 years later update:   

       The /farm causes an error.   

       But www.haven2.com works great, and is an inspiring website (and as it seems also an inspiring real place on earth) to visit.
pashute, Nov 03 2012
  
      
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