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haptic feedback for card readers

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It seems like everything has now embraced 'contactless' technology, although in nearly all these contactless interactions, your bank card/ travel card/ iPhone/ Apple Watch/ magic wand/ etc. or the hand that is holding one of these does make some contact with the reader. Therefore the reader should provide a tiny jolt of haptic feedback during the interaction to show that the transaction has worked - the reader is mains-powered so (unlike haptic feedback on your phone) there isn't a power-conservation issue.

I know that these readers provide other kinds of feedback too (e.g. a beep) but people don't hear this if they're wearing headphones, and if the combination of feedback makes a transaction complete slightly faster this could be immensely beneficial. On a transport system like the London Underground, with 5m passenger-journeys per day, the ticket barriers are a source of congestion, and shaving just a fraction of a second off the transaction could make a big difference.
hippo, Feb 04 2019

Ooops wrong link Variable_20weight_20cashpoint_20cards
adding weight to a payment/bank card in realtime, and vice versa [not_morrison_rm, Feb 06 2019]

[link]






       //magic wand/ etc// My two dogs are both chipped - I'm wondering if the technology exists to pay by spaniel.
MaxwellBuchanan, Feb 04 2019
  

       Yes it does, but you risk getting your change in chihuahuas ...
8th of 7, Feb 04 2019
  

       While it might seem, on first glance, an excellent idea to enable canine-based contactless payment (so that you can, for example, stride purposefully into a coffee shop, make your order ("Coffee, please" - people who stride purposefully don't fanny about with lattes, cappuccinos and flat whites), and then command your faithful pet to go and pay for it ("Rover, pay! - good dog!")), after a very short period of time the colossal flaw of this approach will become evident, that is, that a reasonably intelligent dog will grasp the basic principle of contactless payment and will sneak off to the local butcher's with increasing frequency, returning to you looking a bit dazed and fatter.
hippo, Feb 04 2019
  

       // looking a bit dazed //   

       Are there any Labradors that don't have a permanent "a bit dazed" look ?
8th of 7, Feb 04 2019
  

       Sorry - "looking a bit more dazed than usual"
hippo, Feb 04 2019
  

       It's just an act : they figger if they look a bit out of sorts, they'll get a sympathy doggie treat.   

       Meanwhile, idea [+] : my "tap'n'go" doesn't work all the time with every machine, and I can never remember which part of the card goes onto which part of the reader.
FlyingToaster, Feb 04 2019
  

       I haven’t used my Oystercard for about four years or so, I switched to Android Pay as soon as it became available for me, and have been using that ever since on TfL to travel. I was reading over the weekend (somewhere on Wikipedia) that TfL ranks among the largest number of transactions in some list of European contactless thingies.   

       Over a year ago I switched to iPhone (huge improvement for me, with all the iOS synth software I have on the iPad, most of it works on the phone too). The difference with the iPhone is that I have to put my finger against the fingertip reader each time. This has to be done quite ceremonially, whereby I whip my phone out of its pouch in a grand flourish holding it in my right hand and with my left hand, sweep my arm over so that my finger reaches the iPhone fingerprint reader on the phone. It all has to be done quite slowly and purposely, if it was meant to be done quickly why doesn’t it just tap in like Android pay which can be done in (large) fractions of a second? Apple Pay is obviously meant to be savoured. People huddling nearby have the effect of pushing my hand slightly off centre, which causes the fingerprint reader to reject my fingertip, so I have to push the offending people away and reject them before I can get a good reading. That’s obviously how it is designed, and I fully approve of this sedate approach.
Ian Tindale, Feb 04 2019
  

       //pay by spaniel//   

       My spaniel has gone grey around the muzzle and developed an uncanny resemblance to Clemenceau. Do you think that would impact his payment limit?
pertinax, Feb 06 2019
  

       Of course it will, but in a good way. He can extort massive reparations from the Germans under the Versailles treaty.
8th of 7, Feb 06 2019
  

       Our cat is chipped - does this mean I can "wave the pussy" to get train rides?
DenholmRicshaw, Feb 06 2019
  

       You're more likely to get arrested - or, depending on where you are, accosted ...
8th of 7, Feb 06 2019
  
      
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