Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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honey workout

possible workout for zero gravity
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imagine a gigant mug (enough to fit a person) filled with thick honey, in the top of it there is a very thin, resistant stretchy and transparent fabric that allows you to step over the mug, get swalowed by it but your body does not touch the honey. You recive air via a hose. then you start a solw workout like swiming.

This might be a perfect orbital workout center.

noyola, May 20 2009

Real_20100m_20freestyle_20swimming [hippo, May 20 2009]

Swimming in syrup http://news.bbc.co....agazine/4801670.stm
People can swim just as fast in syrup as in water [hippo, May 20 2009]

Viscous Brutality Viscous_20Brutality
by st3f. [calum, May 22 2009]

[link]






       maybe an advanced material that mixes silk and latex, or a space age material... good point though.
noyola, May 20 2009
  

       People can swim just as fast in syrup as in water (link) so I'm not sure this would cause people to expend more energy.
hippo, May 20 2009
  

       the stickyness of real syrup would prevent you from swimming at all, the real question answered in the BBC link is the influence of viscosity on swimming, which is, obviously, small to none, as you use the viscosity to generate thrust to overcome viscosity generated drag.   

       Using high-viscosity medium as a workout-zone is valid, as is proven by 'aqua-jogging'. I do not think you need the fabric, as long as the fluid does not adhere to the body overly. To submerse a human, you would need something less dense than water, which is good news if you want to bring great quantities of it into orbit. As you need water up there anyhow and drink the recyled excreted water / washing water etc. anyways, maybe gelled water would be sufficient.
loonquawl, May 20 2009
  

       "To submerse a human, you would need something less dense than water, which is good news if you want to bring great quantities of it into orbit."   

       Surely in zero gravity the density of the fluid is irrelevant? The concept of 'submerged' must be replaced by 'sharing volume'.   

       Perhaps a ball-pit filled with light, hollow steel spheres which are all magnetised.
Twizz, May 20 2009
  

       [Twizz]: You are absolutely right. I might try to weasle my way out by mumbling something about artificial gravity, spinning stations etc. but actually, i just got hoodwinked by the presentation of the idea: //step over the mug// - - from that point onwards, there was gravity in my mind's eye.   

       Still, if you want to bring a volume into orbit, it should better be as low a weight per volume, as possible. Nothing to do with submersability in orbit, though.
loonquawl, May 20 2009
  

       //You recive air via a hose. then you start a solw workout like swiming.// - Ah! - the pure poetry of it all.
xenzag, May 20 2009
  

       //if you want to bring great quantities of it into orbit//   

       Honey shouldn't be a problem. Bees weigh next to nothing.
shudderprose, May 20 2009
  

       Bees weigh even less if you can persuade them to keep flying while you launch the bee-pod into orbit ;-)   

       A large field of flowers for the bees to feed from might weigh a bit.
Twizz, May 20 2009
  

       This could be done with plastic ball bearings. After the exerciser enters, compress the sides of the mug slightly.   

       Oh - light hollow spheres. Twizz beat me to it.
bungston, May 20 2009
  

       //A large field of flowers for the bees to feed from might weigh a bit.//   

       Sending the bees and the field into orbit might well pay for itself though. You just need to ensure that you're sending uninfected bees up there, then wait until the bee blight claims all the terrestrial bees and you will have control of the planet's only supply of honey.   

       Until that time, just market your product as "Space Honey" at 1,000,000% the cost of boring "earth honey".
wagster, May 21 2009
  

       [wags] that's a great idea of itself, a bee ark that's designed to ensure a future source of bees once all the ones on earth are dead.   

       It could simultaneously supply the (non diabetic) crews of any space stations that are in orbit with a steady supply of honey.
zen_tom, May 21 2009
  

       We could do the same for bananas. Did you ever see "Silent Running"?
wagster, May 21 2009
  

       Love it - I wonder whether Huey is still out there (or was it Louie?)
zen_tom, May 21 2009
  

       Glen Miller.
Ian Tindale, May 21 2009
  

       I haven't seen it since I was small, but I have it on my laptop and am looking forward to a reprise.
wagster, May 22 2009
  
      
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