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hydropower assist

fire and water
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The idea is to use a stirling cycle to increase the force of natural water flow.

You could use some of the force of the natural flow to compress a body air in a chamber. This step would take place after the water had passed through a toggle valve.

Close the valve, heat the chamber, and the column of water is pushed with a great deal of force through a nozzle that turns a pelton wheel.

The force of the natural flow of water is then used to move the hot air to a cold chamber, and the cold air into the hot chamber. Then the process starts again.

The cold chamber could be created by taking a little water off to spray some fins on the chamber.

These things could be stacked in a series for maximum effect.

nomocrow, Nov 30 2006

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       Cool, nicely put. The technology is not new but used in a new way!   

       ideas for a use?
dev45, Nov 30 2006
  

       This is similar to your "stirling underwaterwheel generator" except now air heats up and cool air is introduced again (although I think the air is missing from your description). I think the other idea would work as well if you alternated cooling and heating cycles.
jmvw, Nov 30 2006
  

       I was thinking of power production in low-head or low-flow situations.   

       [alternating]//heating and cooling cycles//   

       The other idea does alternate heating and cooling cycles - the air is cooled when it bubbles up through the water, which is cooled by a radiator. In theory, that is.
nomocrow, Nov 30 2006
  

       I mean in one spot. Heat the tank, then let cool it, then heat it, then cool it etc. The Stirling Underwaterwheel Generator would certainly work if you did that. Hydropower Assist seems similar to that, except you added a heating and cooling cycle by filling with cool water + air and then heating, then filling with cool water + air, then heating etc. That and you're using water instead of air to drive something now.   

       Nice about the stirling engine is that alternate application of heat and cold isn't necessary, the engine takes care of that.   

       I think the Underwaterwheel was stranger and therefore better.
jmvw, Dec 01 2006
  
      
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