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multinuclei fraction causes fission

protons from different atoms are pushed near each other then form regular spatial patterns these patterns are right at the brink of having a proton neutron ratio that will fission with an additional proton With that proton you get fission or new forms that act like new elements during the grouping
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Fission fusion fraction You’ve heard of fission You’ve heard of fusion Now visualize an environment where protons from different atoms are pushed near each other then form regular spatial patterns these patterns are right at the brink of having a proton neutron ratio that will fission with an additional proton

here we make fractional elements from positive nuclei compressed with antiproton beam

** *()* **

That’s a graphic of a bunch of protons huddled together if a proton fills the () the group averaged fractional atom will fission thus what we do is turn on a proton beam to make the fractional group radioactive

Now if you’ve heard of Bose Einstein condensate the idea of grouped atoms forming a wide blob of coherent matter is old physics The difference here is the way to make what is a fractional element from a group of protons plus neutrons

Grab a group I element like sodium but preferably something highly electropositive like rubidium remove all the electrons with a beam of positrons Then absent electrons to buffer them the protons will start moving with the well known proton conduction mechanism where positive charge differential moves atoms once the protons are streaming they can be focused with a patterned positron beam The idea is to guide the proton rich nude nuclei nearer to each other until you get a stream of adjacent nuclei super near each other These are so near each other that they behave at their place of reference like the nucleus of a different element with much higher mass

If you kept going with this thing that is like a nude nuclei linear accelerator with positrons compressing the proton rich nuclei you would eventually produce a fissioning beam of nuclei that is plausible as the vastly higher energy fusion from compressed plasma has been made with a tokomak The vast energies of the tokomak suggest the a narrowing beam of nuclei plus antiprotons will create a fission beam

This is thrilling three ways first superheavy stable elements are predicted Fractioning nuclei this way at the right starting elements creates these new superheavy stable elements Also thrilling is the ability to create metastable higher energy isotopes rather like new kinds of nuclear isomers as the protons are pumped to higher geometries (just like nuclear isomers) The third thrill is making plutonium239 from depleted uranium plus a beam of fractional elements

beanangel, Jan 27 2009

graphic version http://tinypic.com/...php?pic=34xgchl&s=5
[beanangel, Jan 27 2009]


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Annotation:







       //visualize an environment where protons from different atoms are pushed near each other then form regular spatial patterns//   

       <twilight zone music> imagine a world where spoons are not your friends<\tzm>   

       The term "polymath" is used to describe someone who excels in a wide variety of disciplines. There must be a corresponding term for our Beany, bless.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 27 2009
  

       Try this: take fission with fusion and you may get geffilte vision.
pashute, Jan 29 2009
  


 

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