Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
I never imagined it would be edible.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                         

nested bin liner

makes putting a bin liner in a bin easier
  (+15, -1)(+15, -1)
(+15, -1)
  [vote for,
against]

Putting a bin liner (ie a bag) in a bin is a relatively simple task, but could be made easier still.

Presently bin liners are sold as a continuous roll of bags, with perforations separating each bag. Installing a new liner into a bin comprises the following steps: 1. tearing off the bag from the roll. 2. 'inflating the bag' ie. converting the bag from its flat form into a shape that roughly fills the bin. 3. inserting the bag into the bin and folding the top of the bag over the edge of the bin.

This process is repeated for each new bin liner.

If the bags were sold in a nested form (ie each bag inside the next), step 1 would be unnecessary and steps 2 and 3 would only have to be performed once.

As each bin liner fills, it is simply removed, leaving a fresh bin liner ready to go.

An added advantage of this system is if the bag ruptures the next bag is already there to receive the waste (and waste is 'double bagged'), hence the bin itself never soiled.

xaviergisz, Jan 06 2005

As opposed to... http://www.russianl....php?cPath=35_21_92
[RayfordSteele, Jan 08 2005]

[link]






       Good idea. I might try a manual version (put the liners inside each other myself) next time I need to change one.   

       I predict there will be one or two problems to solve: when you take out the inner liner the others will cling to it, which will turn them inside out out pull them out of the bin.
caspian, Jan 06 2005
  

       makes tearing them apart difficult though. only kidding. +1
po, Jan 07 2005
  

       An added benefit is that with each emptying of the bin, you gain a little more capacity. This slightly increase the bin changing interval so maybe by the time you have used nearly all the bags, you get 2-3 minutes (average) more trash generating time.
swamilad, Jan 07 2005
  

       Costly but good.
FarmerJohn, Jan 07 2005
  

       Also, in many cases step (2) had to be performed twice, once when you try to the open the "wrong" end of the bag, and again after you turn the bag around to find the "right" end. All fixed by this pastry of an idea.
phundug, Jan 07 2005
  

       A sharp object in bag one will cut through/pierce several 'virgin' bags and allow water/bacteria to seep into them where the bacteria will multiply/smell/contaminate new garbage in succeeding bags.
mensmaximus, Jan 07 2005
  

       I did this myself for many months, I had to clear out the studio at the end of the night and 3am is no time to be looking for bin liners. It saved a lot of time but strangely it never occured to me that they should be manufactured this way. Definite bun, notwithstanding [mm]'s perfectly valid point. Use them for light waste only if that becomes a problem.
wagster, Jan 07 2005
  

       I don't know how compactly the bin liners could be stored prior to use (since an assembly of nested ones might not fold as well as individual ones do) but otherwise this would seem to have considerable merit. I don't know that there'd be any more tendency for the #2 liner to stick to the liner being withdrawn rather than to the #3 liner, but even if it did it should not be hard to push it back into place.
supercat, Jan 07 2005
  

       Call them Matrashka bags...
robinism, Jan 08 2005
  

       I was just going to post this idea myself. Just thought of it yesterday: only 3 years and (roughly) 82 days too late. I give you the bun this idea deserves.
macncheesy, Mar 29 2008
  

       I think it would be impractical for the reasons that [mensmaximus] states. A better solution (and easier to implement using the current production methods) would be to just leave the box of bin bags in the base of the bin. As you pull a full bag out, you tear it away from the next one, then fold the top of the next one over the top of the bin. I might start doing this myself, actually. Bun for bringing it to my attention though.
jtp, Mar 29 2008
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle