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wrong number filter

Make wrong numbers a thing of the past
  (+3, -7)
(+3, -7)
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Constantly botherd by wrong numbers ? Or called back a missed wrong number ?

Well here's my, plug in and forget solution, a smallish olive green box that attaches to your phone line and filters wrong numbers.

Your phone will just not ring if the detects the caller has dialed the number incorectly.

Its so simple it must have been done already.

In fact I have called lots of wrong numbers in the past and the phone was not picked up, so it must exist !

loroloco, Apr 22 2006

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       That's an excellent idea. The exchange already knows your number, and can therefore compare it with the intended number that the person is dialling, and if it doesn't match, it can arrange things so that your phone doesn't ring.   

       In fact, this could be extended to ordinary phones, not just landlines. A special alternative selectable ringtone could be made to play when wrong numbers are received - that way you could tell without even seeing the screen.
Ian Tindale, Apr 22 2006
  

       One small problem...   

       Does it come in blue?
Jinbish, Apr 22 2006
  

       thanks, IT. I have a headache now.   

       I'd like metallic silver please.
po, Apr 22 2006
  

       Seeing as I am the guy that often dials the wrong number in the first place, I would like this on my end. It will automatically sense when I've dialed the wrong number before it even starts to ring and changes what I've dialed to the number I've intended. I want my in textured eggplant.
NotTheSharpestSpoon, Apr 22 2006
  

       This really should be MFD'd as baked (by your own admission), so I can extort you into giving me my one in speckled beige.
dbmag9, Apr 22 2006
  

       It could inform the dialist (in Tom Baker's voice) that they have the wrong number, and automatically put them through to the right number. [loroloco] You Mad and Silly Genius - You should have patented it! It's too late now, it's out in the public domain. Bah!
Dub, Apr 22 2006
  

       Some wrong numbers aren't.
Ian Tindale, Apr 22 2006
  

       aren't what?   

       in a kind of purple mood tonight.
po, Apr 22 2006
  

       I want orange. I like orange. And blue. But for this, I want orange.
DesertFox, Apr 22 2006
  

       //aren't what?//   

       Aren't wrong, of course.   

       Some numbers are a wrong number. Some wrong numbers aren't wrong numbers. They're wrong wrong numbers. That doesn't mean they're right numbers, just not wrong numbers.
Jinbish, Apr 23 2006
  

       Some wrong numbers are right too. I once dialed a number incorrectly and got the Boston Scuba Academy. I would've missed out on so many wonderful experiences if they didn't pick up.   

       Deep blue, please.
Shz, Apr 23 2006
  

       I shall bun this one, however, at the risk of being the one who can come up with reasons why good ideas are bad, I would be the one to suggest that not every wrong number is necessarily a wrong number but sometimes its the RIGHT number dialed by the wrong person. I once called a friend from the receptionist desk at my doctor's office. The receptionist later returned not knowing that I made a call so she pressed the redial button thinking that she was the last one to use the phone.
Jscotty, Apr 23 2006
  

       This is almost implementable on the dialing side in any phone with a memory. The phone could do the same thing Google does when it says "did you mean to type TO WOMEN", because it notices that you tend to dial a very close number.
theircompetitor, Apr 23 2006
  

       What was that line?   

       "Oh, sorry, I must have dialed the wrong number."
"That's OK, it was ringing anyway."
Ling, Apr 23 2006
  

       How dows it know if someone has called the wrong number?
Germanicus, Apr 23 2006
  

       The digits will differ from the right number. Computers can spot that sort of thing.
Ian Tindale, Apr 23 2006
  

       The quantum computing approach of doing this would be to simply dial all possible numbers in existence simultaneously, and wait for the right one to pick up...
zen_tom, Apr 23 2006
  

       Add an improbability drive and telephone booth you would have one hell of a time traveling, anywhere in space going spaceship. In textured eggplant. With Tom Baker letting you know where and when you're not going as you are going/ whening somewhere/ sometime else.
NotTheSharpestSpoon, Apr 23 2006
  

       In the same vein--a right number that turns into two crank calls to yourself: You lose your cell phone in the house, and your spouse says, “Why don’t you dial your cell number?”
“Oh...yeah. Good idea.”
So you call it from your wireless in the living room. Listening to the ringing, your mind goes off in a thousand directions as it generally does, and you suddenly hear your cell phone in the kitchen. You say “Hold on,” and walk over there to pluck the cell from where it’s fallen into a basket of fruit. “Hello?” you say. “Hello?” But no one’s there, nothing but the loud whine of feedback. Irritated, you cut off the cell and put the wireless remote to your ear. “Sorry about that...you still there? Hello?” Really irritated now, you march back into the living room and slam the remote in its cradle, saying, “Damn those people.”
ldischler, Apr 23 2006
  

       A problem is where someone uses one number for a long time, then starts using another one which is similar which they actually intend to dial. For instance, my number used to differ from my future wife's number by a single digit. Nowadays our 'phone numbers are even more similar. Also, we run a business here and its number differs from another local business by one digit, so if this happened, people could lose out on business, such as the scuba people.
nineteenthly, Apr 23 2006
  

       How can it differ by less than a single digit?
dbmag9, Apr 23 2006
  

       By being the same number. It could also differ by being an anagram of course.
nineteenthly, Apr 23 2006
  

       Cunning.
dbmag9, Apr 23 2006
  

       It could be one of the digits after the decimal point, in which case it'll differ by less than one whole digit.
Ian Tindale, Apr 23 2006
  

       You are all mad.   

       I want mine in black with a blue LED in a chrome circle and with HAL's voice: "I can't let you answer that call, Dave".
methinksnot, Apr 23 2006
  

       [Zen_Tom], you could get a cat in a box to dial the numbers. That'd work.
Dub, Apr 23 2006
  

       Can you have an anagram of a number?
Ling, Apr 24 2006
  

       96
Shz, Apr 24 2006
  
      
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