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Computer Mouthpiece

Computer input device for voice chat directly from your mouth. (a tube with a muffler and microphone inside it, analogous to car muffler.)
 
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Input methods using keyboard much slower than voice, but we use the slower method, because voice can heard by others, disturb others, and so on. In noisy environments microphones pick up a lot of noise making a partner have difficulties hearing what you are saying.

Since most of the signal of a human voice comes out from the mouth and nose, this mouthpiece would let you cover them, preventing others from hearing you, and interfering with your conversation. You would speak to a tube with a muffler and microphone inside it (it would look like a singer's microphone, except that you would hold or attach it like a breathing mask.)

Mufflers (silencers) had successfully been used in cars and even guns, and I see no reason why they wouldn't work here.

Inyuki, Oct 01 2012

Vintage Straightaway Helicopter Aircraft Pilot Headset Headphones & Microphone http://www.etsy.com...helicopter-aircraft
Headset Microphone H-133C/AIC MODEL 372-8CMC, 5965-226-7870, D6A900-69-C-C973, DAVID CLARK CO. INC. [Inyuki, Oct 01 2012]

Stenomask http://www.martelelectronics.com/MM.html
There are variations on this theme in the assistive technology world. Also see historical Hush-a-phone FCC hearing. Read Tim Wu's Master Switch [JesusHChrist, Oct 02 2012]

[link]






       // Mufflers (silencers) had successfully been used in cars and even guns, and I see no reason why they wouldn't work here. //   

       Because the point of a sound suppressor is to dissipate, elongate, and remove the high- and low-end apexes (sp?) of a sound, and in the case of firearm sound suppressors, to convert as much of the sound as possible into other forms of energy, mainly heat. Whatever sound emerged from the 'muffler' would not be distinguishable as coherent speech.   

       If the idea here is simply to prevent others from overhearing what you are saying to your computer, use a subvocal microphone, a nifty military/espionage gadget which is strapped or glued to the neck just below the jawline. You mumble into it using the faintest whisper, and your speech is amplified by the receiver worn by the communicating party.
Alterother, Oct 01 2012
  

       [Alterother], it makes me wonder, how clear is the recording from the subvocal microphone. It certainly doesn't prevent the noise interference.
Inyuki, Oct 01 2012
  

       I have no idea about recording quality, but it works well enough for special forces operators to communicate clearly over long distances without being overheard by enemies standing mere yards away.   

       Please note that I've never used a subvocal mic, only read about them. They are in common use worldwide, albeit in a select community. I'm told that the Isrealis absolutely love them.
Alterother, Oct 01 2012
  

       Are you talking about a throat mic? That works by the vibrations of your throat, so it won't pick up any background noise and you don't have to worry about positioning the mic in front of your mouth.
DIYMatt, Oct 01 2012
  

       Yes, I believe that is what I mean. Specifically, the kind that works whether you're shouting or barely whispering.
Alterother, Oct 01 2012
  

       There also used to be microphones meant for flightline workers with a sealed facemask, but they ceased to exist when I started googling for them.
DIYMatt, Oct 01 2012
  

       [DIYMatt], is this what you had in mind? (see link)
Inyuki, Oct 01 2012
  

       ^That would be it.
DIYMatt, Oct 02 2012
  
      
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