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Diamond Lights

A girl's second best friend (nothing to do with Hoddle and Waddle)
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Despite [jonthegeologist]'s protestations that cubic zirconia are a girl's best friend, I have recently become the wearer of a very lovely diamond ring. In the last 24 hours I have spent a considerable amount of time admiring said diamonds and comparing how they look in a wide range of lighting situations.

From this highly scientific study, I have observed that the rocks are most sparkly under artificial light, preferably those small halogen bulbs. As I want my new jewellery to look its best at all times (preferably to blind people with its brilliance at 50 paces so they are forced to admire it) I need some way of ensuring it is always seen under halogen lighting. Therefore I propose the Diamond Light.

This battery-powered light would be mounted on a flexible arm, which could be attached either to the forehead miner-style, to the upper arm, or indeed to an adjacent finger of the same hand. By pointing the light at the diamonds, the best sparkliness is guaranteed at all times.

There are some similarities with the Back-lit wedding ring, but I feel lighting from above is needed for maximum effect.

hazel, Mar 18 2004

Backlit Wedding Ring http://www.halfbake...t_20wedding_20rings
Another solution from [bobofthefuture]... [hazel, Oct 04 2004]

[link]






       Then congratulations are in order to the pair of you!.
I have recently been working at a Diamond Trading Hall in London and they use light with some UV at the end to pick them out.
gnomethang, Mar 18 2004
  

       Doesn't UV generate Ozon, which chemically erodes the diamond? Better add a nitrogen purge nozzle to the contraption.
kbecker, Mar 18 2004
  

       Congrats! ;) Is this the first HB wedding?
silverstormer, Mar 18 2004
  

       thank you [silverstormer], we're both very happy. Whilst there are other halfbakery couples, I don't know if there are other halfbakery fiance(e)s or spouses.
jonthegeologist, Mar 19 2004
  

       //sposes//   

       Sposes?! I ain't becoming *no-one's* spose.
hazel, Mar 19 2004
  

       I didn't think much eroded diamonds [kbecker] but I'll check it out. I am reliably informed by geologists that I know that a diamond can be destroyed by heating it in a bunsen flame then dropping it in liquid oxygen. To be honest, I guess you can destroy pretty much anything this way! If ozone does then the laser printer is out the window and there's no more holidays to the seaside for me!
hazel, Mar 19 2004
  

       there was a previous halfbaked married couple but alas neither has been seen here in an age!
po, Mar 19 2004
  

       Congratulations guys.   

       as [po] said: halfbaker + halfbaker = baked.   

       Two half croissants to you.
phlogiston, Mar 20 2004
  

       Well, it all depends on the cut of the stone. For example a round brilliant cut stone would require the light to enter from the back. This is because this type of cut uses 67 facets on the pavillion (back) of the stone, which reflects light to the 17 on the Crown (front) Therefore light coming at it from the front would have little eefect, which would make this idea rather obsolete. Favouing the backlit wedding ring. This is simmilar with most cut, bar the Edwardian, marquise, and trilliant.
shinobi, Oct 10 2006
  
      
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