Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
"Not baked goods, Professor; baked bads!" -- The Tick

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


           

Extensions hair by hair

Go from crew-cut to long-hair in a matter of days
 
(0)
  [vote for,
against]

I understand that the average human head has about 120 000 individual hairs.

Imagine someone with very short hair, for some reason, wanted it long and wasn't going to wait for it to grow back; or use wigs, weaves, extensions or the like.

Would it be possible to take a strand--be it human hair, horse-hair, or nylon--and either laser weld it to the stubby hair from the scalp, hair by hair, or glue it?

A binary glue might be needed. After all, on one hand, you want it to dry quickly, yet on the other, this process would take hours.

At, let's say, 5 seconds per hair, 2 stylists could do it in about 80 hours.

For those with tinning hair, one might use artificial hairs that "fork."

Ideally, one can comb, shampoo, swim, etc, even vigorously, without (more than normal) hair loss.

Great Satan, Jun 10 2003

Hair Loss Portal of New Generation http://www.CloneMyHair.com
[thumbwax, Oct 04 2004]

Hair Loss Portal of New Generation http://www.clonemyhair.com/
[thumbwax, Oct 21 2004]

[link]






       Laser weld, no. Glue, I suppose. The process is not worth the bother, considering the quality of wigs and extensions currently available.
Cedar Park, Jun 10 2003
  

       I agree, not for most people. But what of models and actors. I'm sure a few 1 000 might be open to the idea.   

       This in turn could lead to some innovations.   

       I'm sure the idea of breast implants were once considered bizzare.
Great Satan, Jun 11 2003
  

       Some still consider it bizarre.
Pseudonym #3, Jun 11 2003
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle