Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Giant Garden Umbrella

In case it rains (again)
  [vote for,

The Giant Garden Umbrella is stored in a deep concrete or metal silo buried in the centre of the garden; the "cap" of the silo can be some sort of attractive garden ornament, perhaps a sundial.

When the remote control is activated, the cap moves aside, and the furled umbrella rises slowly and majestically to its full height, which can be up to ten metres.

The umbrells then unfurls, covering the entire garden.

Pressing the other button on the remote furls the umbrella and stows it away until next time.

The silo has a built in hot air dryer system to dry the umbrella if it's put away wet.

A windspeed sensor automatically stows the umbrella if the safe wind speed is exceeded, and prevents it deploying in such circumstances.

8th of 7, Aug 17 2008


       Interesting (+), though you may want to add some kind of gutter or water dispursement device at the edge as a lot of water could come off it. Or since it will probably gather at the midway between the ends of the rods, include a radial array of some type of water feature to catch the overflow.
MisterQED, Aug 17 2008

       Rain is such a seldomly enjoyed occurrence in Southern California and the gardens so obviously appreciate the opportunity for a thorough cleaning and deep replenishment that one has to wonder why a giant garden umbrella would be a good idea. If you want to enjoy feeling connected to the outdoors but don't personally want to ever get wet, then build a solarium. If you don't want the plants to get wet, then bring them inside the solarium.
jurist, Aug 17 2008


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