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Half Bakery Evolution

Evolve new Ideas from Old
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Utilize Evolutionary Computing to evolve new ideas from ideas on the HB.

Computer would select 2 random ideas then combine them to evolve a new idea. The ideas would be scored and then the better ideas would be mated to evolve a new set of ideas. Eventually really great ideas, really bad ideas or just really strange ideas could be evolved.

jhomrighaus, May 05 2006

Darwin's Halfbakery Darwin_27s_20HalfBakery
[bungston, May 05 2006]

New ideas via concatenation New_20ideas_20via_20concatenation
This one is actually close enough to make this redundant. [bungston, May 05 2006]

Like this? Flaming_20Rooster_20Tail_20Skis
Shameless, perhaps, but an example of using existing halfbaked technology when creating newer halfbaked technology. [Shz, May 05 2006]

[link]






       Shirley, we need to find a way to stop bad ideas from multiplying...
ConsulFlaminicus, May 05 2006
  

       [jhomrighaus], nice idea, but until you formulate and explain some method of codifying an idea in such a way that it can be combined with another in order to create something new, this idea isn't really doing anything for me.   

       Once that part is figured out:
What would be the mechanism for selection?
What would be the mechanism for survival?
What would be the (or would there be a) mechanism for mutation?
zen_tom, May 05 2006
  

       I'm new to this forum, but even though most ideas I've posted are original (thought up then checked for repetition), a couple came from thinking of a greatly modified version of something else I've seen here (i.e. more fun or interesting). The intuitive leap of idea generation via the human brain can't be beat.   

       That said, this reminds me of something I've been thinking about for a fun and creative community process...(see upcoming post ;)
Whirligig, May 05 2006
  

       I was thinking less along the lines of just mixing up the words as in the to links and more along the lines of mixing the content of the ideas themselves as was described in the annotations. I have not gone too much further in my description as I was curious to see what kind of input was offered on the core concept. [boysparks] hit the nail on the head in his description I think the difference here is that this would have the potential to evolve completely new ideas in areas and ways that noone had ever really considered.
jhomrighaus, May 05 2006
  

       A computer scientist by the name of John Koza actually has applied the technique of Genetic Programming to developing new inventions. He has successfully received at least one patent (US 6847851) using the technique.
blaise, May 07 2006
  

       I read the same article and that is one of the inspirations for this idea.
jhomrighaus, May 07 2006
  

       // then combine them to evolve a new idea.//   

       your talking about AI. this idea was well worded, but you dont mention how to make it work. shouldn't that be a requirement? you're basically saying "lets make some AI that can solve our problems" and thats all your saying. a better idea would be to put 1000 monkeys in a room with 1000 typewriters for a year.
auricom_mech, Aug 04 2006
  

       You have any idea what kind of mess that would make of the typewriters? Not to mention having to clean up all the dessicated monkey corpses. I think that would be a much worse idea than just saying "lets make some AI that can solve our problems".   

       Just trying to keep things in perspective...
NotTheSharpestSpoon, Aug 04 2006
  

       Actually this is quite simple, Take two ideas and mix them together(keep some parts of each and drop some parts) Then evaluate the new idea. if its good it moves to next round. if its bad it gets droped. then take all the "good" ideas and start the process over. This is a very simple process. I admit to lack of the intimate details of the current evolutionary computing technology that is sited above but it is not imaginary, it exisits and is being used, it has even generated a product that has won a Patent.
jhomrighaus, Aug 04 2006
  

       The problem with that approach is the problem of evaluating goodness, which a few hits of the random button will show is not a simple problem.   

       I have thought about this approach using essays or poems. The check against goodness would be the AI built into Word or something similar: these AIs can check grammar and style. One could even allow the AI to correct the concatenation as it saw fit. The progeny would then go back for another round of concatenation.   

       Ultimately, the survival fitness of these creations would be determined by posting them to one of those services that sells college/high school essays, seeing which one was used most often.
bungston, Aug 04 2006
  

       Actually I was intending for the good/bad judgement to be made by the bakers of the Half Bakery. Only the best will survive. Allow them to "live" for a limited time then move to the next round. More buns means survivial. This will not however be a super fast process.
jhomrighaus, Aug 04 2006
  

       in what way would the computer recieve the original ideas? are they strings of text or are they mathematical interperetations??
auricom_mech, Aug 04 2006
  

       We are way overthinking this. You could do this with a scissors and paper if you wanted. The idea is the "concept" of evolving the ideas, not the process of evolving ideas. you could do it a million different ways, the thing that I was proposing was to do it then use the resulting ideas to generate new ideas. The existing approaches to this did not continue the process forward.
jhomrighaus, Aug 04 2006
  
      
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