Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Professional croissant on closed course. Do not attempt.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


         

Human Jeanome Project

Identify individual humans by their unique Jeanome.
  (+2)
(+2)
  [vote for,
against]

The other day, I laid out all my pairs of jeans (2) on my bed to establish whether I needed to buy any new ones (yes). It struck me that a pair of jeans looks a bit like half a chromosome. It also struck me that the odds of someone else having the exact same collection of jeans, in the same sizes and with the same wear would be astronomical (the frayed ends represent a hyper variable region, which often reduces in length with age).

Now, my observations could well be useful. Genetics, as we all know, has provided a pleasing diversion in biology. We were all very impressed with the peas and long stringy stuff, and the worryingly obsessive "sequencing" malarkey. However, science must progress, and I'm pleased to report that the focus has shifted back to the important business of figuring out how Ca2+ gets where its going, while the DNA sits around trying not to acquire mutations.

Now, we all know "genetic fingerprinting" is all well and good, but there are many problems with this: DNA is invisible, you need all sorts of fancy equipment to visualize and manipulate it.... worst of all, you'll need a molecular biologist.... and they never wash their cups and insist, against all evidence to the contrary, that 1ul can be accurately pipetted. DNA is fragile, it has a tough reputation but believe me, a couple of cycles in the washing machine and it soon gives up.

So jeans. They're tough, versatile, visible to the naked eye and can be used to identify an individual. Simply upload you're personal Jeans-Chromosome Karyotype (example chromosome <link>). And you will be identifiable.

Even if you're burnt to a crisp in a horrendous fire, the rivets, buttons and zip will still be around, to locate your charred remains and bring vital solace to your grieving relatives.

bs0u0155, May 06 2013

Jean Chromosome https://docs.google...kU/edit?usp=sharing
[bs0u0155, May 06 2013]

[link]






       I wear the clothes and the jeans of the dead. All from thrift shops. A jeanome of my closet would be of 10 plus people. Still a study would at least please the Japanese.
popbottle, May 06 2013
  

       What about those who don't own any jeans?
pocmloc, May 06 2013
  

       //the important business of figuring out how Ca2+ gets where its going, while the DNA sits around// Ahem. The calcium is only moving around in order to keep the DNA going.   

       And as for //a couple of cycles in the washing machine and it soon gives up//, I once inadvertently put a screwtop Eppendorf of oligo through the washing machine. It was fine.   

       I might also point out that, in contrast to DNA, jeans will be subject to inheritance of acquired characteristics, which really just makes a mockery of, well, everything. Moreovermore, the JCR is still at an early stage of development and requires vast quantities of expensive denim and even more expensive oligopocketides.   

       In conclusion, just no.
MaxwellBuchanan, May 06 2013
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle