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imcTG and MIR progression

imcTG and MIR progression
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First off, hi. I'm sortof new here. Second off, this isn't so much an idea as a hypothesis...I was looking for somewhere to bounce this around, and this seemed like a good place...

Recent literature has associated insulin resistance in muscle cells with interference of the insulin signaling pathway by excess intramyocellular triglyceride (imcTG) and fatty acid content, and the correlation between imcTG and MIR is now well established; it has been further postulated that imcTG is in fact, a source of MIR, as well as an indicator.

In individuals exhibiting MIR, glucose is taken to the liver, where it is then converted to fatty acids, rather than being taken to the insulin-resistant muscle cells for metabolism. If this is the case, I believe it is a possibility that these fatty acids could somehow end up in the the muscle cells, and thereby contribute to further reduction of insulin sensitivity.* In this way, MIR would itself contribute to its own progression.

*Edited to be a statement. But now it sounds like I think I know what I'm talking about...

Comments? Questions? Accusations?

transcriptase, Jul 10 2013

Intramyocellular lipid kinetics and insulin resistance. http://www.ncbi.nlm...gov/pubmed/17650308
[transcriptase, Jul 10 2013]

Intramyocellular lipids: maker vs. marker of insulin resistance. http://www.ncbi.nlm...gov/pubmed/17766054
[transcriptase, Jul 10 2013]

[link]






       Welcome officially, and good luck. It's always nice to see a lurker take the plunge.   

       Prepare to take a raft of shit for this post not being an actual halfbake. Try re-writing it as postulation rather than inquiry; it may take some of the sting off.   

       I now leave you to the tender ministrations of 'bakers who know what you're talking about. This stuff is way out of my league.
Alterother, Jul 10 2013
  

       Welcome, molecular biologist!   

       But, as pointed out, this is a theory rather than an invention...
MaxwellBuchanan, Jul 10 2013
  

       // But now it sounds like I think I know what I'm talking about //   

       Yep, that's how it's done. You should fit in nicely.
Alterother, Jul 11 2013
  

       What [MaxwellBuchanan] said. Theories are frowned-upon around here, unless you can connect them to an invention of some sort. To avoid the dreaded "marked for deleting", you may have to edit your main text, to add something inventive. It is possible that the Deletion Patrol will be lenient for a few days, giving you a chance to do that....
Vernon, Jul 11 2013
  

       I'm not sure that makes sense grammatically... you're saying that MIR (which I assume means muscular insulin resistance or something like that) is a bad thing, but you want it to contribute to its progression ?
FlyingToaster, Jul 11 2013
  

       [FlyingToaster]: MIR does indeed mean muscle insulin resistance, my apologies for not clarifying that acronym earlier. And I don't "want" MIR to contribute to its own progression, it's merely a postulation as to the mechanism by which MIR progresses.   

       As pointed out by [Vernon] and others, seeing as this idea does not fit with the purpose of the site, I think I'll just let it be "marked for deleting"...I'm having a hard time finding any way I would incorporate this into an invention. I have a couple other ideas that are more "inventive".
transcriptase, Jul 11 2013
  

       // I have a couple other ideas that are more "inventive". //   

       Post it, and they will bun...
Alterother, Jul 11 2013
  
      
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