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Record Politicians' Missions

It's OK to video tape soldiers at work. What about elected officers?
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Technology now allows us to record video and sound from a person's point of view unobtrusively. At earliest this was possible 5-10 years ago.

It seems reasonable to record Soldiers and Police Officers on the job because others can evaluate their actions, learn from them, and even use the video as evidence in court. These positions are filled by huge numbers of people who do them to earn a living along with more noble goals.

Would it be equally reasonable to record Politicians, who are a very elite few that (1) don't plan to earn a living by being elected and (2) are chosen much more specifically for their words?

The idea: All new Federal Politicians must implant or wear a recording device. The device must be on during business hours, whenever they are in the office, and whenever they are at fundraisers. All footage is on YouTube or similar.

This way we can get a better grasp on who influences the people we elected and what their views are.

Intrusion on privacy would prevent a lot of people from running, and would increase the selflessness required for the job. Yet, we apply it to Police, Soldiers, and other public servants without much thought; many private sector jobs (e.g. fast food) have constant surveillance.

While reducing privacy for the public at large is to be avoided, I say it is fair to require it of public officials.

Bcrosby, Sep 05 2008

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       Amusing idea, but it belongs in the category of "Make Everything Right".   

       You're talking about policing the people who make the rules. A law mandating this would never pass.   

       I can imagine some 500 channel television station, with all the bored busybodies following the actions of the polis they despise or love.   

       And the means of circumventing this would be highly amusing as well.
normzone, Sep 05 2008
  

       The beauty part is honest politicians would record more.   

       Technology can at least prevent 'looping' a feed, letting someone else wear the device, or modification of the video. Make attempts to alter or fake content outright illegal; allow deletion.   

       Current mass media has no rule like 'Thou must not lie'.
Bcrosby, Sep 05 2008
  

       I think that plenty of information is publicly available, but people just don't look for it or know where to find it. The bills that a politician has voted for or against are particularly relevant, but seldom appear in the media. Instead we get rhetoric.   

       Politicians also spend a lot of time attending conferences, making speeches, visiting schools, hospitals etc. It seems to me that politicians are already doing everything they can to be on TV 24/7.   

       A better start would be to spread the knowledge that is already public domain so the average voter can remember something about their candidate other than soundbites. Such as their voting record.
Bad Jim, Sep 08 2008
  

       you'll just turn offices into soap-boxes and move the dirty stuff off-site.
Voice, Sep 09 2008
  

       which is where it is supposed to be... plus we get to enjoy them acting as children *all* the time [+]
xxobot, Sep 12 2008
  
      
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