Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Tense Converter

Tool in word processing packages which converts text to an alternative tense.
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The door of the ground floor apartment creaked open as Harun Khan stepped onto the empty, rainswept street. The miasma of doubt which had consumed him thus far was suppressed with a long drag on his French cigarette. A newspaper blew past, one page catching on his leg. He looked down and could just make out the headline on the sodden paper: "Garrett the Badger arrested for arms dealing".

The door of the ground floor apartment creaks open as Harun Khan steps onto the empty, rainswept street. The miasma of doubt which has consumed him thus far is suppressed with a long drag on his French cigarette. A newspaper blows past, one page catching on his leg. He looks down and can just make out the headline on the sodden paper: "Garrett the Badger arrested for arms dealing".

I'd really hate to have to write the software for this, especially when it comes to the Third Person Plural Conditional Past Perfect, but I think it would come in handy, especially for beginner novelists who are as yet unsure of what style of prose to adopt.

stupop, Sep 18 2001

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       Harun Khan creaks open the door of the ground floor apartment and steps onto the empty rainswept street. He supresses the miasma of doubt that has consumed him thus far by a long drag on his french cigarette. A newspaper blows past, catching one page on his leg. Looking down, he just makes out the headline on the sodden paper: "Garrett the Badger arrested for arms dealing".   

       Tense, mood, and voice. Choice of 'which' in a restrictive clause. Grammar checkers aren't so sophisticated yet.
reensure, Sep 18 2001
  

       I thought it was a decimal to whatever-it-is-we-use-in-the-UK-that-we-like-very-much converter
po, Sep 18 2001
  

       you think we like pounds and inches or whatever, well I don't realy but it seems that we are just stuck with them due to tradition or something... Its all right though as the European union should have us nicely decimalised soon...
RobertKidney, Sep 18 2001
  

       UB you mean one in every twelve
po, Sep 19 2001
  

       yes we brits like very much, pounds and pence, pounds and ounces and degrees fahrenheit and feet and inches and yards and chains etc yes robertkidney whatever european place or planet you are on - some market traders risk going to court to protect what they LIKE THANK YOU VERY MUCH   

       - a few weeks on... from this feeble rant, I do not know why I was so excited by such a mundane cause
po, Sep 21 2001, last modified Oct 17 2001
  

       ...and fathoms and acres and micronewts.   

       When I see this idea I keep thinking of wall warts trembling with repressed rage and angst. Today at a second-hand store there were all these AC/DC converters tangled together in a box, cords taut and prongs rigid, and the tension was palpable. I hope they can get some relief when the lights go out tonight, but I fear they were all males. At both ends.
Dog Ed, Sep 22 2001
  

       I like this idea - particularly if it is combined with eBooks. I *really* hate books written in the present tense and find them very hard to read. But I still want to read them - what I'd like is to download them to an eBook and then run the tense converter to past tense. The author's 'experimental' style suddenly becomes readable.
richard b, Aug 19 2003
  
      
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