Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Youthpaste

The healthy snack kids'll stick with.
  (+4, -2)
(+4, -2)
  [vote for,
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This yummy craft adhesive for youngsters is actually a healthful edible paste of vitamins and minerals that every creative glue-eating kid needs. Nutrition disguised as gluition.

Best of all, it's sugar-free!

nihilo, Jun 27 2006

[link]






       Howsit woik?
methinksnot, Jun 28 2006
  

       You know-- it's sticky and healthy. Like Peanut Butter. Like Elmer's, but with vitamins.
nihilo, Jun 28 2006
  

       Egg whites.
Texticle, Jun 28 2006
  

       Can't argue with scientifical knowledgeablity. [+]
methinksnot, Jun 28 2006
  

       Just as long as it looks and tastes nothing like Elmer's.
RayfordSteele, Jun 28 2006
  

       craola uses corn starch to attach the wrappers of their crayons to make them non-toxic. it's a good idea.
tcarson, Jun 28 2006
  

       So you can eat rice glue; big deal, you can eat Elmer's, too. Snot is sticky, mucilaginous, and edible, also. That doesn't make it Youthpaste. Youthpaste is intended as a food product that kids can use for craft projects-- a dietary supplement, good-tasting, and fortified with vitamins. A quick Google search turns up no discriptions of rice glue as an adhesive being "yummy", a "healthy snack" for kids, and replete with "vitamins and minerals" -- the exact defining characteristics of Youthpaste.   

       Glue exists. Kids' snacks exist. Childrens' vitamins exist. This idea combines all three factors. Without them, you don't have this product.
nihilo, Jun 28 2006
  

       Raw garlic is good for you and makes a decent paper glue. Not sure about "yummy kid's snack" though.
wagster, Jun 28 2006
  

       No; the volume of the child is the only limit.
"Orange", "white", and "pink".
No-- but much to the chagrin of the animals, it has been thoroughly IMproperly tested.
nihilo, Jun 29 2006
  
      
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