Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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"lights-off" buzzer

Just like it sounds.
 
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I live in a large, brightly-lit city. So bright, in fact, that drivers here frequently forget to turn on their headlights at night when pulling out of a parking lot or driveway (I've been guilty of it myself, usually after dimming my lights passing through the gates to get on base, but that wasn't in this city). As a result, this city also has a VERY high rate of automobile accidents. Almost every night, there is an accident somewhere, causing traffic (which is already considerable) to get even more backed up with each accident.

So I propose this: An indicator that, at night, activates a buzzer if the headlights are not turned on. It would sound similar to, but not exactly like, the seatbelt buzzer, and also include a dash icon.

21 Quest, Jun 24 2006

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       I'll give this a positive vote for couple of reasons. I saw a car driving without lights just last night. My vehicle has automatic headlights, which are always on, and I cannot turn them off.
baconbrain, Jun 24 2006
  

       So it works with a timer?
BJS, Jun 24 2006
  

       But I thought he said "I live in a large, brightly-lit city. So bright, in fact, that drivers here frequently forget to turn on their headlights at night...", so wouldn't a light sensor not work?
BJS, Jun 24 2006
  

       The difference between sunlight and the brightest of city lights is considerable. We seldom realize how great it is, as our eyes adapt to the different levels of light. Try testing it with a camera setting, or some other kind of meter.
  

       I have a light sensor on my vehicle, which changes the panel lights and driving lights between day and night modes. It has never mistaken city lights for day. It assumes that anything much less than full sunlight is night-time, which is a fail-safe mode.
  

       BJS, you are doing it again.
baconbrain, Jun 24 2006
  
      
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