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pegless clothesline

backyard clothesline, fixed, quick + easy drying
 
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Your normal standing clothesline, though instead of a single line it consists of two. The bottom is fixed. The top line about 40mm above. this top line is connected to a simple flick down lever. The clothes are fed through the 40mm gap, the lever is then pulled down. The top line moving 10mm below the other and due to the levers configuration ends up directly under the first line locking in the clothes. quick and easy
ctown, Jul 08 2004

(?) DrCurry's link on *another* washing line idea http://www.jgwhyte.com/clothesline.htm
[po, Oct 04 2004]

[link]






       open the lines to remove one dry garment and all the rest fall on the floor.   

       welcome to the halfbakery, ctown btw.
po, Jul 08 2004
  

       Or, simply twist them together a dozen times to have a dozen 'pinch points.'
RayfordSteele, Jul 08 2004
  

       po: while I suggested that exact thing, I don't believe I linked to it.
DrCurry, Jul 08 2004
  

       the clothes shouldnt fall out they hang over the bottom line, the locking system i used is different to the travel clothes line, and this method is quicker than the twisted way because you dont have to hold the lines open for every piece of clothes, hey wat is this site like is it just ideas and disscussion, does anyone use these ideas.
ctown, Jul 09 2004
  

       hey, im new, too. we can be new together!!
yellowblueberries, Jul 09 2004
  

       [DrCurry] – it was someone else's link.   

       Those are very useful when you're staying in motels, as long as you can find something to hook them on. Not lightweight curtain rods, though – I won't make that mistake again.
Detly, Jul 09 2004
  

       im kinda confused on how this will work.
yellowblueberries, Jul 09 2004
  

       Po is right. This won't do it if you want to remove one single dry garment.
NeoPiter, Jul 09 2004
  

       Yes it will.   

       Its like pulling the clothes from a closed cloths-pin only you don't worry that the cloths-pin falls down.   

       Besides there are several possibilities to pry the lines open in one place, while the rest is tight.
pashute, Oct 06 2006
  

       OK I'm going to need an illustration here. Are these "lines" rigid? I assume they are... OK, what is the span distance? In other words, these "lines" need to be very stiff in order to clamp with any force.   

       Bun withheld in lieu of a diagram of sorts. Maybe I’m being dense, but I can’t see it working.
Custardguts, Oct 06 2006
  

       Was there a problem with clothes pegs? Are they now classified as weapons of mass destruction? Are they preventing wrinkly old gypsy grandmothers from engaging in air travel now?
Ian Tindale, Oct 06 2006
  

       I think the problem with clothes pegs is that they *have* to be engaged and disengaged one at a time. I think that what [ctown] has in mind is time-efficiency when you're trying to get the whole wash off the line in a hurry, e.g., when it starts raining (correct me if I'm wrong).   

       However,
1. I don't like the increased need for garment-balancing when loading this new line (to make sure nothing falls off before you've pulled the top part down), and
2. I'm not happy about the possibility of much of the load falling straight to the ground, bearing in mind that one washing basket is probably the wrong shape to catch it all.
  

       So, is there any chance of adding
1. a high-friction surface to prevent fall of clothes while loading the thing and
2. a non-linear configuration of the 'line' and/or a non-standard design of laundry basket, so that you can get all of the wash quickly into the basket?
  

       I suppose the high-friction surface would have to be somehow de-activated during unloading, or it would add time, nuisance and wear and tear on clothes. Who's for retractable velcro?
pertinax, Oct 06 2006
  
      
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