Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Percolating Hydroelectric Generator

Heat Powered Lord Kelvin's Thunderstorm
 
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This is a heat powered electrical generator, with no moving parts. Because the temperature differential between heat input and output are relatively low, efficiency is low; however, this also means that low temperature heat source (an inexpensively made solar thermal collector, for example) can power the device.

Water is heated in a boiler located at the lowest part of the system, and the bubbles of steam push slugs of water up a pipe, in the same manner that water in a percolator is sent up the stem to the coffee grounds.

The gaseous and liquid water are separated, in a gas/liquid separator. The steam goes to a condenser, and the condensate is reunited with the water from the separator.

The water from the phase separator and the steam condenser pass through a Kelvin water dropper, producing static electricity.

The water then drains from the charge collectors down into the boiler.

The two droppers, charge inducing rings, and charge collectors of the Kelvin water dropper, are in a pair of gas tight electrically insulated tubes.

The electricity from the Kelvin water dropper is fed to a maximum power point tracking circuit, which draws power at just the right number of amps to maximize the wattage produced.

goldbb, Feb 03 2012


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