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Skiing on Sulfur

artificial ski resort for all seasons
  (+6, -7)
(+6, -7)
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Elemental sulfur is a dirt cheap material produced in vast quantities by SOx removing filters in coal power plants. It's a soft, non-toxic yellow powder.

Skiing on sulphur should be possible with especially adapted skis/snowboards. Unlike snow, sulphur doesn't melt on pressure, but its brittle nature would make the experience similar to skiing/snowboarding on sand dunes.

The idea is to dump millions of tons of powdered sulfur in a derelict industrial site to create artificial mountains suitable for skiing (it is already being stored this way on a smaller, local scale). Unlike snow, sulfur stays solid even in hot weather so this type of skiing wouldn't be limited to winter or colder parts of the world.

kinemojo, Sep 06 2005

Building the resort. http://www.pixelsan...03-sulphur_pile.jpg
[2 fries shy of a happy meal, Sep 06 2005]

Sulfur facts http://www.speclab....elements/sulfur.htm
[ldischler, Sep 06 2005]

(?) Slag heap skiing http://www.natives....03/tom/slag1_sm.jpg
[ldischler, Sep 06 2005]


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Annotation:







       soft, non-toxic and stinky. no thankS
dentworth, Sep 06 2005
  

       To your information, elemental sulfur is completely odorless. You're thinking of hydrogen sulfide, not sulfur. Do your research before criticizing blindly.
kinemojo, Sep 06 2005
  

       I know I have seen pictures of an enormous mound of yellow waste sulfur. I cannot find a reference to it now. If I recall,it was many stories high - I think in Canada. I was never able to think of any use to put it to.
bungston, Sep 06 2005
  

       //Do your research before criticizing blindly//   

       It may also be wise to do your research before posting nonsense [kinemojo]. Elemental sulphur has approx 3 times the mass of powder snow - good luck falling off your skis onto that.   

       Elemental sulphur also has several thousand times the value of water / ice. How do you propose to pay for your enormous ecological disaster / eyesore?
ConsulFlaminicus, Sep 06 2005
  

       A word to the wise, [kinemojo] - keep it polite. Halfbakers know a little about [dentworth], but nothing about you. Which of you do they find themselves supporting? If you make your first ideas places of conflict, people are much more likely to be against your other ideas, purely because you've offended them. Not how it should be, but how it is, so tolerate us and we'll tolerate you.
david_scothern, Sep 06 2005
  

       That's "for your information" [kinemojo]. Learn your language before retorting inarticulately. Bitching aside, welcome to the HB.
DocBrown, Sep 06 2005
  

       I was thinking: why Sulphur? How about some other materials like mashed potato or sugar?
Ling, Sep 06 2005
  

       Custard powder?
coprocephalous, Sep 06 2005
  

       //Elemental sulphur also has several thousand times the value of water / ice//   

       Sulfur is a waste product. In some parts of the world it's simply dumped on landfills in large heaps.   

       //Elemental sulphur has approx 3 times the mass of powder snow//   

       I don't think the density matters as much as the hardness. Sulfur is softer than packed snow. I'm sure falling on an icy slope hurts more than falling on sulfur.
kinemojo, Sep 06 2005
  

       Of course, the other advantage that snow enjoys is that smokers can safely ski on it too.
coprocephalous, Sep 06 2005
  

       ..and on snow, you can tell where the bears have pissed..
ConsulFlaminicus, Sep 06 2005
  

       Don't eat the white sulphur.   

       I was remembering a little yellow rock in my rock collection, that did have a faint odor, but it was labeled as sulfur. sorry if that is a false info.
dentworth, Sep 06 2005
  

       bungston, I saw a few piles like that in North Vancouver recently. It may be what you're thinking of. I had no idea what it was and had to ask a local.   

       [edit] Just looked at the first link and that looks like it may be it.
goober, Sep 06 2005
  

       oh 2 fries made me laugh out loud!   

       CF says its heaps more expensive that water and kinemojo says its dirt cheap. who is right?   

       ski with bare feet and cure your athlete's foot!   

       (should that be feet?)
po, Sep 06 2005
  

       Thanks for the pics, [2 fry]. Those are some sweet yellow heaps. I would ski them for sure. Naked, to get the most dermatologic benefit.
bungston, Sep 06 2005
  

       I used to work at a place that used sulphur. It was handled with copper shovels to lessen the possibility of a spark-induced dust explosion. Eventually, we did have one. Inhaled sulphur dioxide contacts water in the lungs - yields sulphuric acid. Guy involved survived, but not in good shape. I think I am inclined to be cautious of your resort.
lurch, Sep 07 2005
  

       /I think I am inclined to be cautious / WUSS! Grow some hair and strap on those copper skiis!
bungston, Sep 07 2005
  

       //soft, non-toxic and stinky. no thankS//   

       Hmmm dentworth's capitalized S is making a run for it.
DesertFox, Sep 07 2005
  

       Probably they do this already, in Hell.
bungston, Sep 07 2005
  

       Hi DF, the S is for Sulfur   

       and I was wrong about the odor, but it seems there are far greater risks to skiing on Sulfur than stinkiness.
dentworth, Sep 07 2005
  


 

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