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Baby poo diaper organic fertilizer business

We buy your baby's crap
  (+7)
(+7)
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We sell organic cotton/bioplastic based diapers that, after use, you dump into a special plastic bag. We pick up the bag, and turn the stinky diapers with their poo into organic fertilizers.

With rising fertilizer prices, the abundant nitrogen and organic material in the baby crap is worth quite some money.

We're currently analysing the market. Research on the total quantity of baby poo being produced in the industrial world is difficult. But we're getting there. One poo at a time.

django, Feb 18 2011

Halfbakery: Diaper lawns (2003) Diaper_20lawns
[jutta, Feb 19 2011]

Brown 25 https://www.youtube...watch?v=008BPUdQ1XA
Ad spoof [popbottle, Mar 29 2014]

[link]






       I think if you offered a change service, people would pay you to take it away...
RayfordSteele, Feb 18 2011
  

       Yes, people do that it seems. There's a question of whether it's mere tabu or whether there's a genuine hygiene issue depending on how hot the compost heap gets. Urine's not a problem but faeces may be. Plenty of our friends do this but not for profit.   

       There might be problems with some of the substances in the stools. Various things come through milk into the infantile GIT, including dioxins and there are also medicines such as antibiotics which might make a difference.   

       Are you thinking of composting using biological processes or others? Heating it could introduce an overhead but make it safer, though i have no idea how various substances would respond to it, e.g. drugs and so forth. The other thing is whether polio vaccine is used while the child is in nappies.   

       Have you thought about phages? The Soviets used to extract them from sewage.   

       Also a good source of ammonia and phosphorus for other purposes.
nineteenthly, Feb 18 2011
  

       This is a good idea. [+]
pocmloc, Feb 18 2011
  

       The scale is the issue. I have a recycle system that taxes all recyclables at the point of mfg. the diapers, adult pads etc. then are dictated to be organic. This allows also other materials to subsidize the diaper recycle tax. My web page is www.environmentalfisherman.com
Steven J Scannell, Feb 19 2011
  

       The point shouldn't generally be reached where something has to be recycled, though there are exceptions such as hygiene.   

       Urine is a good source of compounds not easy to obtain elsewhere by non-industrial processes, particularly phosphates and ammonia. The faecal side is probably more straightforwardly biological, though stercobilin might be a good surfactant.
nineteenthly, Feb 19 2011
  

       Hmm...brown gold.   

       Did toy with the notion of getting urea out of pee, least carbon footprint would be big cylinder on the side of a handy mountain or cliff, at the bottom of the cylinder a RO filter, clean-ish water comes out and the pee would eventually reach a concentration to make evaporating it less CO2 producing.
not_morrison_rm, Mar 29 2014
  

       From what I understand human urine can be applied to a lawn or garden (diluted), for beneficial fertilization... better do it just before a rain though, or those downwind won't be too happy. Out "in the sticks" it could be used to mark territory to keep predators away; wonder if there's a shelf-life before the local carnivores take a whiff and think "meh, that's sooo last week".
FlyingToaster, Mar 29 2014
  

       I once had a lawn that doubled as my urinal. There were no neighbours, and beautiful skies at night to look at while peeing. I shared the goodness around, and went quite far from the house. The lawn didn't benefit noticeably, but neither did any nasty little swamps form. The only real benefit stemmed from the fact that you're not free if you can't pee on your own lawn. (Alas, I am no longer free.)   

       Too much pee will kill most things. Once, around the Tiergarten in Berlin, there was a terrible swamp with few islands between the open water. Strangely enought, the trees seemed to survive this, but there was not a blade of grass below, only mud.   

       Somewhere between these two extremes you will find no ideal happy medium. Things just keep getting better toward the best extreme.
skoomphemph, Mar 29 2014
  
      
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