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Cubbyscope

proper insert telescoping cupboard door.
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One maintenance issue I have to deal with is the loss of kitchen corner cupboard doors. This is due to the design of the bi-fold cupboard door which has the weight of the second door hanging off hinges on the first standard hinged door. Closed, this system is to two cupboard doors at 90 degrees. This system always works loose and ends up in missing screws,hinges and/or doors.

How about a downwards telescoping door. The door would be like a topologically radially stretched car aerial. A circle cross section stretched to a rectangle with two half circles at each end bent in the middle 90 degrees. The door would be soft close sprung with catches at closed, half shelf height and full open. The door material would be powder coated steel or aluminum.

Of course 100 or so mm is needed for fully compacted size so the complicated bottom hinges lower the door to the floor, through toe-kick height. By telescoping down the door to half or full, the hand and body position is ready to take out needed objects and a slight tap to release catch raises the door.

The door can take on any horizontal cross-sectional shape but must allow the repeatable insert reduction, in the vertical, for telescopic action. I would like the bottom to be the smaller section, for cleanliness, but that would be impossible with bottom hinges.

Ultimately this is a cupboard door that is complex, over engineered and difficult to manufacture, ideal to hide a pile of fish bones.

wjt, Jan 26 2019

Roll-up door example from an "Appliance Garage" https://www.kitchen...om/cau/na-ao160.htm
[scad mientist, Jan 27 2019]

(?) Zipper[Mm]ast http://zippermast.com/
Mentioned in my anno [notexactly, Jan 28 2019]

[link]






       Or consider a roll-up, or even a garage door style.   

       I had a double-hinge type on my old house pantry lower. That kitchen was a nightmare until we redesigned that corner.
RayfordSteele, Jan 26 2019
  

       How will it seal against the frame ? There will be a taper from top to bottom because each successive section needs to be thinner than its predecessor.   

       There may also be a tendency to stick, as the axis of the components needs to be consistent and guide rods can't be used.
8th of 7, Jan 26 2019
  

       [RayfordSteele] Because of the 90 degree a roll up won't have the physics. Two roll ups might work but opening then requires two door action.   

       [8th of 7] In most of the cheaper kitchens, hermetically sealed cupboards are not required just splash resistance, helped by the lip of the bench and a way of hiding of possessions.   

       True, any knock, dirt will reek havoc with the telescoping. Maybe more end clearance and a high viscosity, kitchen friendly, grease or nylon insert could act as a better bearer. Wall thickness and material will be the determining factor in knock resistance.
wjt, Jan 26 2019
  

       Wait; is this still meant to fit in a corner?
pertinax, Jan 26 2019
  

       I'm not sure exactly what [RayfordSteele] was picturing with his roll-up option, but if it's built like a roll-top desk or appliance garage [link], but with two separate sections that split apart as they go around the curve, that could work. The bottom piece with the handle would be a continuous L shape since it doesn't need to go around the corner. The joint on the rest of the pieces would need to be some kind of zipper-like mechanism so the pieces lock together when closed to avoid falling out of the track or requiring a center column, but when they reach the top and start going around the curve, they split apart.   

       Maybe even better would be a roll-down door, so if you want to reach the top shelf, you only have to bend over far enough to put the door halfway down, rather than having to reach all the way to the floor any time you want to open the door at all. That makes it more like the original idea as well. It would of course require some mechanism like springs or counterweights to keep it closed. The door slats could roll down into the toe-kick area, or the bottom shelf could be slightly raised.
scad mientist, Jan 27 2019
  

       Could be vertical slats like a roll-top tipped sideways.   

       The title makes me think of some covert office cubicle warfare accessory.   

       Roller options do cut down space because of the curvature needed to have a good 90 degree slidey turn. A horizontal slide would not be able to half open. A roller door would be simpler and a tried and true mechanism but the other cabinet doors would have to have a unique slatted finish. The Cubyscope probably would have a draw look to it.
wjt, Jan 27 2019
  

       A single door at 45 degrees to the other vertical surfaces would work so long as the countertop has a similar bevel.
bigsleep, Jan 28 2019
  

       I think it should be "Cubbyscope", with two "b"s. I keep reading it and thinking it's got something to do with cubes.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 28 2019
  

       // […] roll-up option, […] with two separate sections that split apart as they go around the curve, that could work. […] The joint on the rest of the pieces would need to be some kind of zipper-like mechanism so the pieces lock together when closed to avoid falling out of the track or requiring a center column, but when they reach the top and start going around the curve, they split apart. //   

       I'm imagining it would would like the [linked] thing.   

       // Maybe even better would be a roll-down door, so if you want to reach the top shelf, you only have to bend over far enough to put the door halfway down, rather than having to reach all the way to the floor any time you want to open the door at all. //   

       Agreed. You'd end up using the top shelf more that way. With the door opening from the bottom, you'd end up using the bottom shelf the most, probably, and that would be inconvenient.   

       // The door slats could roll down into the toe-kick area, or the bottom shelf could be slightly raised. //   

       Isn't the bottom shelf raised already, above the toe-kick? My understanding of common floor-mounted cabinets is that there's an inaccessible volume under the bottom shelf/drawer for this reason. The slats could go in there. Depending on how deep the cabinet is, they might not need to roll up.   

       // I think it should be "Cubbyscope", with two "b"s. I keep reading it and thinking it's got something to do with cubes. //   

       Me too.
notexactly, Jan 28 2019
  

       // covert office cubicle warfare accessory. //   

       Before the days of dirt-cheap webcams, and smartphones with cameras, periscopes constructed by cardboard engineering were far from unknown in cube farms ...
8th of 7, Jan 29 2019
  

       The things I've missed out on could fill a book...   

       Two b's it is. [notexactly] I quite like the zipper tower, clever.
wjt, Feb 06 2019
  
      
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