Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Fresh Meat Anytime

Living Flesh, Needs No Refrigeration
 
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So since they can grow cell culture meat in a lab or whatever, why not take it to the next step and keep the meat alive in some fancy advanced, yet disposable (and stamped with some disclaimer to the effect of "please recycle, 'cause we care so much about the planet") life support system, good for a couple o' weeks/months/years? Just remove the meat from the packaging, prepare, cook, and eat! Imagine eating fresh grilled steak or salmon or chicken or human in the most inhospitable climates!
Size_Mick, Apr 27 2019

Impossible Foods https://impossiblefoods.com/
[theircompetitor, Apr 27 2019]

Startups growing lab meat https://www.nanalyz...ups-lab-grown-meat/
[theircompetitor, Apr 27 2019]

You don't eat a pig like that all at once https://matt.simerson.net/humor/pig.shtml
[theircompetitor, Apr 27 2019]

[link]






       To stay alive, it will need nutrients and to get rid of wastes somehow.
notexactly, Apr 27 2019
  

       Also, cultured meat is a complete waste of time, at least using current techniques. Apart from being fabulously expensive, it's also more or less tasteless.   

       Although "living flesh needs no refrigeration", it does require a constant temperature, precisely formulated growth media and, above all, sterile conditions because it has no immune system.   

       What you really want, in order to be able to enjoy fresh steak in inhospitable climates lacking in refrigeration, is a cow. They're cheap to run, and can operate on grass.
MaxwellBuchanan, Apr 27 2019
  

       Jonathan Swift had a rather more Modest Proposal (q.v.)   

       We have had a fair bit if cheap amusement from "borrowing" domestic animals from your planet and putting them in a freefall environment.   

       There was also a certain amount of quite unpleasant cleaning up afterwards, and we don't recommend cows.
8th of 7, Apr 27 2019
  

       Aren't there nomadic herding societies who surgically lift a flap of skin from the cow's hindquarters, extract a steak, and then re-attach the skin with medical poultices to aid healing? Presumably having enough cows that the wound has healed and re-grown enough before going back for seconds...
pocmloc, Apr 27 2019
  

       //nomadic herding societies who surgically lift a flap of skin from the cow's hindquarters, extract a steak, and then re- attach the skin with medical poultices to aid healing// Uh, no.
MaxwellBuchanan, Apr 27 2019
  

       If gene interplay knowledge becomes seasoned and mature enough, fungi with some extra protein, structure and enzyme DNA coding could mimic meats of all sorts. But this would definitely be a refrig-a-ration.
wjt, Apr 27 2019
  

       What if after you buy it, you could hook it up to your own (filtered) circulatory system to keep it alive and fresh until you're ready to prepare and eat it? ;)
caspian, Apr 28 2019
  

       //Aren't there nomadic herding societies who surgically lift a flap of skin from the cow's hindquarters, extract a steak, and then re-attach the skin with medical poultices to aid healing? Presumably having enough cows that the wound has healed and re-grown enough before going back for seconds...//   

       Not meat that I know of, but the Massai bleed their cattle for food.   

       "Once a month, blood is also taken from living animals, usually to be mixed with milk. This is done as follows: a noose is tightened around a cow's neck, causing the jugular vein to swell. A short blunt arrow with a 1cm tip and its shaft bound with twine, is then fired at close range from a loosely-strung bow to puncture the vein. The blood which spurts out is caught in a gourd. The wound is not fatal and is stopped afterwards with a wad of mud and dung to stop the bleeding: all in all, not that different from people giving blood. The Maasai believe the blood makes them very strong. Curdled blood is called osaroi."   
      
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