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Hear Here

listen hard in a very quiet place
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Sometimes everyone needs to be very quiet, but there are no totally noiseless places open to easy public access.

Anechoic chambers exist, but they are allocated for research purposes only and are also of a small capacity.

The opportunity therefore presents itself to create a large space that has an extreme sound deadening capacity but can accommodate many people at once. There is the desire to share sounds in groups of people. This is one of the reasons why the combined audience attendance of a live performance is different to that of everyone wearing headphones at home in isolation. Sharing near total silence is a the logical extension to that experience.

The effect of being in an anechoic chamber is quite unique. Because all ambient and reflected sound is reduced to close to zero, internal body noises that are usually inaudible become dominant. These include breathing, the passage of food in the gut, and even heart beat/blood movement.

In a room filled with people, these will be the only sounds. ie the chaotic collective noises of human beings quietly breathing, adjusting their clothes and positions, scratching, touching their hair or faces, swallowing, sniffing, yawning, coughing sneezing. Even blinking makes a sound. Some may have internal medical devices that become audible. False teeth may be heard moving in mouths. Knee or shoulder joints can click.

Various terms and conditions for entering, remaining in place and exiting are worth considering.

I have no idea what the combined effect of many people placed together in such a room would be, but if such a space existed it would generate a totally unique experience that is the complete antithesis of the everyday assault on the senses of the noise of the outside world.

xenzag, Dec 31 2018

One person's dystopia ... https://m.imdb.com/title/tt6644200/
... might be another's wish fulfilment. and vice versa. [pertinax, Jan 02 2019]

[link]






       // quietly breathing, adjusting their clothes and positions, scratching, touching their hair or faces, swallowing, sniffing, yawning, coughing sneezing. Even blinking makes a sound. Some may have internal medical devices that become audible. False teeth may be heard moving in mouths. Knee or shoulder joints can click. //   

       Eeeeeewwwwww ...   

       // it would generate a totally unique experience //   

       ... guaranteed to induce vomiting.
8th of 7, Dec 31 2018
  

       For every ointment there is a fly.
xenzag, Dec 31 2018
  

       A surgically installed switch somewhere along the cochlear nerve might be a simpler way to achieve the desired effect, & would save [8th] from being upset by auditory evidence of his own bodies biological functions.   

       sp. "their" own?   

       Or was the point to hear your bodies functions, in which case, why?
Skewed, Dec 31 2018
  

       This is the halfbakery. It's a repository of halfbaked ideas. 'Hear Here' is a halfbaked idea. My work is done.
xenzag, Dec 31 2018
  

       Or, for a lot of us, the incessant ringing of tinnitus.
lepton, Jan 02 2019
  

       ^ All of us if left alone in a sound proof room for long enough will hear tinnitus. It is entroptic.   

       // the incessant ringing of tinnitus//   

       Try an online frequency generator to match the sound. Personally, I have a 15 kHz tinnitus that closely matches the horizontal flyback frequency of old CRT monitors, but I can also hear echoes of complex sounds.
bigsleep, Jan 02 2019
  

       Pardon? (adjusts hearing aid for that maximum feedback squeal effect)
not_morrison_rm, Jan 02 2019
  
      
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