Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Tastes richer, less filling.

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Magma Crock

Tabletop container of molten rock
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Along the lines of a common crock pot, but much better insulated, the Magma Crock contains a few liters of molten rock. Consult your local igneous petrologist to determine the best choices for your location. Casts a cheery scarlet glow on the ceiling, plenty of radiant heat for those chilly winter days. Requires 480 volt 3 phase electrical service (not available in all areas).
batou, Nov 26 2007

3 phase ... http://www.faqs.org...ctric/AC/index.html
Chapter 1 touches on the concept of "phase" in alternating-current circuits, Chapter 10 may go into too much detail ... [batou, Nov 29 2007]

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       If this was bubbling for a fondue pot, I'll give you a bun to dip in it. +
xandram, Nov 27 2007
  

       Several litres of molten rock at 3000°C is going to keep the party warm.
MaxwellBuchanan, Nov 27 2007
  

       He: "Honey, why is the electric bill $12,000 this month?"   

       She: "Must be that new Magma Crock of yours. I told you not to leave it plugged in overnight!"
Canuck, Nov 29 2007
  

       //molten rock at 3000°C// - actually, basaltic lava from Kilauea would be near the top end of the temperature range, at about 1170° to 1200° C. You could also make a little trip to Tanzania and pick up some carbonatitic lava that is fluid at only 500° C. (That is just barely above the first sign of a ruddy glow.)
lurch, Nov 29 2007
  

       Can anyone recommend a link that explains '3 phase'?
pertinax, Nov 29 2007
  

       //about 1170° to 1200° C. // Oops - you're right. I was muddling Centiheit and Fahrengade.
MaxwellBuchanan, Nov 29 2007
  

       At about 1900°C, a butane or propane flame would probably be better than the three-phase power solution. I'd want some way to do rock castings (chromium steels should withstand rock melting temperatures well enough to be used for dishing the stuff out). Sand casting should be able to withstand the rock as well. Granite casting would be a lot faster than granite carving. Just imagine casting your own stone objects at the dinner table. A 'rock casting at home' magazine could come out with fun patterns included with each issue.
vincevincevince, Nov 29 2007
  

       Hmm - my wife's kiln goes up to 1250C (on a normal 230V single-phase domestic supply). If you go near it when it's on, the air is almost too hot to breathe and you can feel your eyeballs drying up, so a magma crock might be too hot for some people, but it's still a cool idea.

[Canuck] Our electricity bill is OK, despite doing one or two 12-hour firings up to 1250C every week.
hippo, Nov 29 2007
  

       //Centiheit and Fahrengade//   

       What about Kelvius and Celsin? Or is that a shampoo?
shapu, Nov 29 2007
  

       Oooh, I love your serving spoons, are they Alessi?   

       No. Tungsten Carbide.
4whom, Nov 29 2007
  

       //Granite casting would be a lot faster than granite carving.// but you wouldn't wind up with granite. Granite's graininess is due to the relatively slow cooling it experiences underground, allowing time for large crystals to grow. If you melted it down, cast it, and left it to 'set' for a few hours, you'd get something more like basalt.
MaxwellBuchanan, Nov 29 2007
  

       And all that from someone willing to heat it all up to 2726.85 K?
4whom, Nov 29 2007
  

       //And all that from someone willing to heat it all up to 2726.85 K// Do you mean 809.72 degrees Newton?
MaxwellBuchanan, Nov 29 2007
  

       Rolls on floor calculating...
4whom, Nov 29 2007
  

       perhaps some kind of rock fondue or magma fountain yummy? getting the rock to 3000C does take a lot of power, but a well insulated crock should limit heat loss.3 phase is used in high current applications it offers no benefit to a heater which could just as easily be DC powered.
giligamesh, Nov 30 2007
  

       Totally off-subject: Is it just me or does the term "cold fusion heating system" come across as an oxymoron?
Canuck, Nov 30 2007
  

       //3 phase is used in high current applications it offers no benefit to a heater which could just as easily be DC powered.// I think the point is that 3- phase can deliver more power than a conventional domestic system. In most UK houses, the heaviest circuit is the cooker, running at something like 30amps maximum. At 240V (rms) AC, this equates to something like 7kW, which may not be sufficient.   

       As for using DC, that would be silly. Most homes don't have a substantial DC supply, and there's no advantage (for heating) in rectifying AC into DC.
MaxwellBuchanan, Nov 30 2007
  

       // Can anyone recommend a link that explains '3 phase'? //   

       Yes, but not to you; 3-phase is for clever people only. Just sit quiet and watch the pretty flashing lights and NO DON'T STICK YOUR FINGERS IN THE MAGMA .... too late ...   

       // butane or propane flame would probably be better than the three-phase power solution //   

       With hydrocarbon fuels, you'd have to have a flue to get rid of the combustion products, and suck in a load of air too. With electric heating, no fumes...
8th of 7, Dec 03 2007
  
      
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