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Outdoor CPU Heat Pipe

Avoid augmenting summer hell with your machine's exhaust.
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Indoors, most of the energy consumed by your computer effectively ends up as heat. In a hot climate, this may raise the room temperature to unbearable heights. No air conditioner is designed to cool a house with an unusually concentrated heat source in one room. Suppose a solid metallic (aluminum?) cylinder, resembling a drain pipe in thickness were installed, one end screwed to your CPU's heat sink (plus a large radiator-like object inside the machine's case to absorb heat from other components), running through the wall, where a box with a large Peltier element (1kW?) terminates in a large Radiator outside of your window. The Peltier would be inactive in winter. Imagine the heights of CPU overclock one could reach in this manner. However, if one is so wealthy as to afford this device, one might as well re-design the air-conditioner for spot-cooling.
dsm, May 30 2001

Wikipedia: Heat pipe https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_pipe
Mentioned in my anno. Despite the title, this idea does NOT describe one of these. [notexactly, Apr 25 2019]

[link]






       Hmmm. What you really want is to avoid venting the air warmed by your various hard-working processors into the room. Maybe do it like this: If your case fan sucks air in, take it out and reverse it so it blows out. Tape a length of clothes-dryer duct over the fan's outlet and run it outside (through a hole in the wall, through a window, whatever). Put a larger fan at the outside end of the duct (also blowing outward) to make sure you move plenty of air. Now your PC will draw cool air from inside the room and exhaust warmer air to the outside. The advantage is that you can probably home-bake this version. Some early PCs had really big fans which would be wizard for the external booster fan in this system.
Dog Ed, May 30 2001
  

       ...groan...
phoenix, Jun 29 2001
  

       Mobile phones don't need nearly as much cpu power as a modern desktop system.   

       Yes, Intel processors are unusually power-hungry ( --> heat-generating), but they're not the only thing in your system generating heat. Your disk and your graphics card (if you have a snazzy new one) probably put out a lot of heat, as does your monitor.
wiml, Jun 29 2001
  

       unless you had the hot air from case fan up near the top of the case you might be blowing you the cold air that is in the case, or you could just hook up central air to your case ya that would be sweet keep your case at a cool 75
Half-Life, Sep 03 2002
  

       Air conditioners don't spot-cool? What kind of airconditioner do you have? (central=vents - Individual=vents also!)
my-nep, Jan 29 2004
  

       I think you'd be far better off with a heat pipe [link] or a liquid cooling loop with a conventional heat pump at the end than a solid rod with a TEC.   

       // Yes, Intel processors are unusually power-hungry ( --> heat-generating), but they're not the only thing in your system generating heat. Your disk and your graphics card (if you have a snazzy new one) probably put out a lot of heat, as does your monitor. //   

       Apart from the monitor, those heats can easily be combined using smaller heat pipes or a liquid cooling loop.   

       I don't know if those things were well-known or commonly used in 2001–2002, though.
notexactly, Apr 25 2019
  
      
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