Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Buy 1/4, get 1/4 free.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                                   

Speed Pedantry

Who is the greatest?
  (+10)(+10)
(+10)
  [vote for,
against]

A competition between teams or individuals to find the greatest pedant(s); and hopefully further the noble cause of pedantry amongst the wider population.

I suggest using 1st editions of the grauniad as a standard competition text. A crack team of Oxford University Pedantry PhD’s examine selected copies of the newspaper at length and determine as scientifically as possible all typos, punctuation mistakes etc. Competitors are given a fixed time in which to find and correct as many as they can. Played by knockout or league style tournaments. In later rounds one may chose to use some of one's time allowance to search for mistakes in competitors' previous answers, earning double points for any found.

I envision this as a primarily non-contact sport. Winner gets a biscuit.

Apologies to anyone who was hoping for an exacting technical discussion about the classification of amphetamine derivatives.

rainbow, Dec 25 2005

grauniad http://www.urbandic...p?term=grauniad&r=f
[rainbow, Dec 25 2005]

Help Group Pedants_20Anonymous
My inspiration. So, so funny. [rainbow, Dec 27 2005]

Please log in.
If you're not logged in, you can see what this page looks like, but you will not be able to add anything.
Short name, e.g., Bob's Coffee
Destination URL. E.g., https://www.coffee.com/
Description (displayed with the short name and URL.)






       Welcome to the 'bakery [rainbow]. Congratulations on posting your first idea about one of the 'bakery's favourite subjects and not mentioning custard or ninjas.   

       // A competition between teams or individuals to find the greatest pedant (s); and hopefully further the noble cause of pedantry amongst the wider population. //   

       This is a competition between teams or individuals to find the greatest pedant or pedants. It should hopefully further the noble art of pedantry amongst the wider population.   

       // I suggest using 1st editions of the grauniad as a standard competition text. A crack team of Oxford University Pedantry PhD’s examine selected copies of the newspaper at length and determine as scientifically as possible all typos, punctuation mistakes etc.//   

       I suggest using 1st editions of The Guardian (a UK based daily newspaper) as a standard competition text. A crack team of Oxford University post- doctorates, with PhDs in pedantry, examine selected copies of the newspaper at length to identify all errors of typing or punctuation as thoroughly as possible.   

       Unfortunately, ideas concerned with pedantry, deserve a pedant's reposte. I got bored writing mine. Indeed, you're probably bored reading it.
jonthegeologist, Dec 25 2005
  

       I think we must permit [rainbow]'s use of "the grauniad", as it has come into common usage, particularly within the intended context. I think, however, it should have been in title case, since there is sufficient specificity to apply as a proper noun. I'll just take my highlighter to the fourth sentence of the second paragraph, which is only a fragment. And I'll take a four-point muggins bonus off [jonthegeologist]'s "pendants reposte", which now has "pedant's riposte" scribbled next to it.   

       I think it's a good thing to play this electronically, at some remove; helps to enforce the "non-contact" part. (I know, you said "primarily", but since I was always the kid that the wimps beat up when frustrated, I take it to heart.) However, that would require the winner to get a digital biscuit, which on my side of the Atlantic would be a "cookie", and wouldn't be much of a prize.   

       I like it. Thank you, [rainbow]. Hello, [Ian], [jon]. Merry Christmas, all!
lurch, Dec 25 2005
  

       Beep! May I challenge "a four-point muggins bonus", for a double or quits bonus?
Ling, Dec 26 2005
  

       I see no reason why not.   

       One of my favorite memories from high school is of two English teachers in a shouting match over my grammar in a Sterling Scholar portfolio.
lurch, Dec 26 2005
  

       [two English teachers in a shouting match ]   

       That's a pleasant bit of imagery. Thanks, [lurch].
normzone, Dec 26 2005
  

       "who is the greatest"... - should that not be "whom is the greater"?   

       "takes the biscuit"..... I once had my version of the origin of that phrase published in the Guardian - like to hear it sometime? (+)
xenzag, Dec 26 2005
  

       [rainbow] "Winner gets a biscuit" Surely, "Winner is awarded a biscuit"? -1   

       [Ian] Use of single apostrophes is for quotation within quotation. -2. Unless you were using the american system; -4 to me.   

       [jonthegeologist] 'bakery or Bakery? Incorrect spacing "post- doctorates". Five currently uncorrected spellings of pedant. -7   

       [lurch] You had the yellow jersey, briefly.   

       [Ling] Current leader.   

       [xenzag] Capital letter missing in "the Guardian". Sailing very close to the wind with your question mark placement and extended ellipsis but can't quite pin you down. -1   

       Yes to please grauniad story.
rainbow, Dec 26 2005
  

       corrected now [rainbow]. One presumes that the negative seven points previously awarded are now rescinded?
jonthegeologist, Dec 27 2005
  

       No, but you are still beating me.
rainbow, Dec 27 2005
  

       "further .... amongst" That, is simply ponderous.
"are given" -- ponderous: receive
  

       The following suffixes, in order of use:
tion … ly … ing … ed … ly … ed … ing … ly … ing … tion
are insufferable.
  

       Smashing good Idea, BTW.
reensure, Dec 27 2005
  

       This idea is... so strange that it needs a bun...   

       This kinda reminds me of some science books that I borrowed from a library. The foreword of the book (written by the author), claimed that in the book (A4-sized with about 300-450 pages, although a few pages had cartoons) there were three grammatical errors, and the first five people who could get them all and sent them in would get a free, author-signed copy of his next book.   

       That book would be great for this, I reckon...
froglet, Dec 27 2005
  

       I would have thought 'objectively' would be a better method than simple 'scientifically' checking for errors. (+)
neilp, Dec 28 2005
  

       I prefer 'by whatever means they contrive' instead of scientifically or objectively. Hell, leave it all out! They're experts (PhD's), whatever, they must know how.
reensure, Dec 28 2005
  

       //Pedantry PhD’s // My understanding of Oxbridge PhDs is that they are not awarded in a particular subject, unlike bachelor degrees, and so a "Pedantry PhD" cannot exist.
AbsintheWithoutLeave, Dec 28 2005
  

       for rainbow - The origin of the phrase "Taking The Biscuit" (1995)   

       The origin of this phrase lies in the strict protocol observed in the early to late middle ages at the royal court, especially in matters concerning food. With so much fear over the real prospect of food poisoning, particularly by badly stored meat, it was customary for the head of the table to be offered first choice rather than having food served directly served unto his/her plate, leading to this custom being afforded as an honour to a special guest to: "take the best cut". In time this action became corrupted to the phrase "taking the biscuit"
xenzag, Dec 28 2005
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle