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Synesthetic readers

it’s fontics...
 
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Children learning to read may have initial difficulty with comprehension, and may become discouraged. In the synesthetic reader, font size and color are smoothly varied to accentuate the important of words and the emotional flow of the passage, aiding in comprehension. This would be gradually phased out in more advanced readers.
pluterday, May 01 2003

Synaesthetic by Blue Man Group http://www.blueman....ture/CD_music.shtml
About halfway down, on the right. RealPlayer clips. [galukalock, Oct 05 2004]

Mozart improves paper folding, not IQ... http://www.news.har...10.12/1-mozart.html
[pluterday, Oct 05 2004]

Fleecing suckers even before birth... http://silent.home....ring.com/mozart.htm
[pluterday, Oct 05 2004]

a study a couple of years ago. http://news.bbc.co..../health/1432495.stm
the mothers chose the music. I wonder if our preferences are genetic? [po, Oct 05 2004]

[link]






       Cute. Kinda baked with Dr. Seuss, don't you think?
k_sra, May 01 2003
  

       So this would be reading with tempo, intensity, and pitch markings? Why not teach kids to read music first, and then produce readers that employ a subset of musical notation symbols?
Don Quixote, May 01 2003
  

       If you expect people to understand you, MrK., you should write more clearly.
snarfyguy, May 01 2003
  

       Having markup available wouldn't affect your writing one whit.   

       There's a theory that babies who are, while still in the womb, played the works of certain classical composers gain a mental advantage over those babies that were not exposed to the music. Mozart is often cited as being capable of raising IQs and math abilities and all manner of stupendous things. It wouldn't be Lizst as his stuff just ain't that great.
bristolz, May 01 2003
  

       Deglet ovrosco. You should be aware before you continue this conversation... when it comes to classical piano, bris got game.   

       (Anyway, I now return to totally ignoring you...)
waugsqueke, May 01 2003
  

       She, Mr.K. She.
RayfordSteele, May 01 2003
  

       <tone="sarcastic">If you haven't noticed by now, we are allowed HTML tags.<trailing>Not that they affect the formatting or anything...</trailing></tone>
galukalock, May 02 2003
  

       <carrying a tray with sundry goodies> Would you all like some tea to go with your tempest?

On this off subject: the Mozart effect didn’t pan out – see the link. And playing music to a fetus? That doesn’t make sense to me. How would the fetus hear it anyway? It would sound all muffled and distorted, like hearing under water. I’ve noticed some people selling gimmicks that supposedly get around that (see link). Like the “silent effect”, a marketing phrase which is just dripping with bogusity. But even though it has been “optimized for the unborn fetus”, this optimization seems to have been done without the need for any actual experimentation on actual fetuses.

I expect one day to see a Mozart Briefs product, whereby sperm are serenaded by stereophonic jockeys. If you want your offspring to get a head start, why stop at the fetus?
pluterday, May 02 2003
  

       I love to read and I love to read to my children. I want my children to love to read also.   

       This strikes me as being counter-productive in the long term. By training those learning to read with added emphasis, I think you will be handicapping their ability. I’m not sure how to phrase it.   

       Training wheels… This is training wheels for reading. Using training wheels to teach someone how to ride a bike is going to make it necessary to teach them twice; once with the wheels and then without.
ato_de, May 02 2003
  

       A good analogy, as training wheels reduce the number of variables that you have to keep track of. No point in losing your confidence at the get go. But are you saying that training wheels should not be used to learn to ride a bicycle?
pluterday, May 02 2003
  

       Lars the betta makes more bubbles when I play Mozart.
waugsqueke, May 02 2003
  
      
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